Celiac Bread Recipes from 1998


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These bread recipes were posted to the Celiac LISTSERV(R) during 1999. Ingredients can change or local adaptions may not be available in other areas, so caution is recommended in the use of any ingredient. These recipes have not been indepently tested for accuracy.

Bread using Zojirushi BBCC V20
Reference File ~ Bread Machine Tips
Bread Machine

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Bread~Bread~Bread~Bread~Bread~Bread~Bread~

 
From: 		John Dankowych <jondank@interlog.com>
Subject:       	Bread using Zojirushi BBCC V20

I modified Bette's recipes for the BBCC V20 

WET INGREDIENTS
4 whole eggs (I used 2 whole eggs + 2 egg whites in first loaf)
1 3/4 cups water
4 tablespoons melted clarified butter
1 1/3 teaspoons rice wine vinegar
2 tablespoons molasses

DRY INGREDIENTS
3 cups white rice flour
1 cup potato starch
1/3 cup tapioca
3 tablespoons potato flakes (are these the same as potato buds?)
3 1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 1/3 teaspoons unflavored gelatin
1 1/3 teaspoons salt
1 1/3 teaspoons egg replacer - (ENER G)
2 tablespoons sugar (I used 6 tablespoons sugar in the first loaf - it
tasted almost like cake)

YEAST
3 1/2 teaspoons gluten-free (regular) yeast (I used 3 teaspoons in the
second loaf)

Zojirushi BBCC-V20 Cycle times
Pre-heating    22 min
Knead            20 min (was 30 min in first two loaves)
Rise 3            70 min
Bake              70 min
--------------------------------------------------------------------- 
From: 		"C. M. D'Orazio" <catsfoot@sprint.ca>
Subject: 	Reference File ~ Bread Machine Tips

Baking Tips Guide For Yeast Breads

Information Text

Loaf Rises Then Falls (Crated Loaf)

-Decrease water or milk by 2 Tbs. or
-Increase salt by 1/4 tsp. or
-Decrease yeast by 1/2 tsp. or
-Flour, too fine or
-Ingredients not measured properly.

Loaf Sides Caved In:

-Decrease water or milk by 2 Tbs. or
-Increase salt by 1/4 tsp. or
-Decrease yeast by 1/2 tsp. or
-Ingredients not measured properly.

Loaf Rises Too High (Mushroom Loaf)

-Decrease water or milk by 2 Tbs. or
-Increase salt by 1/4 tsp. or
-Decrease sugar or honey by 1 tsp. or
-Decrease flour by 2 Tbs. or
-Decrease yeast by 1/2 tsp. or
-Used wrong type instead of dry granular yeast or
-Ingredients not measured properly.

Loaf Does Not Rise Enough
-Increase water or milk by 2 Tbs. or
-Decrease salt by 1/4 tsp. or
-Increase sugar or honey by 1 tsp. or
-Increase yeast by 1/2 tsp. or
-Not enough water or milk or
-Flour too old or
-Flour too low in gluten content or
-Flour too fine or
-Used wrong type of yeast instead of dry granular or
-Accidentally measured salt in Tbs. instead of tsp. or
-Ingredients not measured properly.
Flat Loaf, Little To No Rising, Short and Heavy

-Liquid too hot or too cold or
-Flour too old or
-Flour low in gluten content or
-No yeast added or
-Yeast too old or
-Used wrong type of yeast instead of dry granular or
-Accidentally measured salt in Tbs. instead of teaspoon or
-Ingredients not measured properly or
-Breadmaker unplugged or power interruption.

Crust Too Dark

-Decrease sugar or honey by 1 tsp. or
-Ingredients not measured properly.

Crust Too Light

-Decrease salt by 1/4 tsp. or
-Increase sugar or honey by 1 tsp. or
-Ingredients not measured properly or
-Breadmaker unplugged or power interruption or
-Incorrect bread setting was used.

Uncooked or Partially Cooked

-Decrease water or milk by 2 Tbs. or
-Breadmaker unplugged or power interruption or
-Incorrect bread setting was used.

Overcooked

-Decrease sugar or honey by 1 tsp. or
-Incorrect bread setting was used.

Not Mixed or Partially Mixed

-Not enough water or milk or
-Flour too fine or
-Ingredients not measured properly or
-Breadmaker unplugged or power interruption or
-Baking pan not properly seated inside breadmaker or
-Kneading blade not installed correctly.


Loaf is Soggy

-Bread not removed from baking pan soon after baking.

Gnarly Knotted Top

-Increase water or milk by 2 Tbs. or
-Decrease flour by 2 Tbs. or
-Not enough water or milk or
-Ingredients not measured properly.

Loaf Core Texture Open, Coarse or Uneven

-Increase salt by 1/4 tsp. or
-Decrease yeast by 1/2 tsp. or
-Forgotten salt or
-Ingredients not measured properly.

Loaf Core Texture Heavy and Dense

-Increase sugar or honey by 1 tsp. or
-Decrease flour by 2 Tbs. or
-Increase yeast by 1/2 tsp.
-Used wrong type of yeast instead of dry granular or
-Ingredients not measured properly.

Burning Odor During Operation:

-Ingredient spilled inside breadmaker and/or heating element or
-See Mushroom Loaf Solutions for bread mushroomed over edge of bread pan,
crust burned.

High Altitude Adjustment

-Decrease water or milk by 2 Tbs. or
-Decrease sugar or honey by 1 tsp. or
-Decrease yeast by 1/2 tsp.

Breadmaker Cannot be Programmed or Started

-Breadmaker unplugged or power interruption or
-Breadmaker too hot, allow to cool 15 minutes between baking cycles or
-Breadmaker malfunctioning.

Loaf Burned Completely

-Breadmaker malfunctioning.

~~~
Bread Machine Tips

Amount Measure Ingredient - Preparation Method Directions Only

Bread Machine Tips

1.Use good quality hard wheat unbleached, unbromated flour that has at
least 12 grams of protein per cup. (I like King Arthur) 

2.Use fresh, quick dissolving active yeast, not rapid rise.

3.Open the machine and check the dough during the first 5 - 10 minutes
of the first kneading cycle!!! Even if your manual says not to do it:
flour acts as a sponge absorbing moisture on wet days and becoming
dehydrated during dry weather. You'll have to adjust for fluctuating
humidity and barometric pressure by adding small amounts of flour or
liquid to the dough.

4.If you've never made bread before and don't know what dough is
supposed to look like, buy a package of frozen bread dough (at your
local supermarket), and let it defrost according to the package
directions. Place it on a lightly floured surface and play with it until
you are familiar with the consistency. This is what you're aiming for in
the bread machine.

5.Now, to adjust the dough in your bread machine during the first knead
cycle: wait until the ingredients have been kneaded for 3-4 minutes. If
the dough looks sticky and wet and is coating the bottom and sides of
the pan, then sprinkle in flour, a tablespoon at a time (you may need up
to an extra 1/2 cup) while the machine is kneading, until you have a
smooth, supple ball of dough. If the mixture is dry and corrugated
looking or the dough doesn't hold together then sprinkle in additional
liquid, a little at a time, until the dough is smooth and pliable and
forms a cohesive ball. If you've wandered away from your machine only to
return to find a wet messy glob or a dry desert thumping around in the
machine, press stop (you can do this at any time - except if the machine
has gone into the bake cycle), add a small amount of flour or liquid and
press start. Stick around and make additional adjustments, if necessary,
until the dough looks right.

6.I have found that when you are either making dough, or placing the
ingredients in the machine to make bread at that time, you can add
either the liquids first or the dry ingredients first. The major
exception to this is the old dank (no longer made) where the yeast must
be placed in the bread pan first in a position farthest away from the
kneading blade. When programming ahead make sure to place any dried
fruits away from contact with wet ingredients as they will absorb those
liquids and throw off the recipe. Extra kneads and extra rise times all
contribute to the depth of flavor, character of the crumb and general
personality of a loaf of bread. One of the reasons I dislike rapid rise
yeast and rapid cycles on the bread machines is that the dough really
requires the entire life span of the yeast to become the amazing miracle
that is bread. If you are partial to whole grain breads and are winding
up with lower loaves than you wish, then try a double knead cycle: place
the ingredients in the machine and program for dough or manual. At the
end of the final knead reprogram the machine for bread (of Whole Wheat)
and press start. You've given the dough an extra work-out to develop the
gluten - that will result in a higher loaf. For an even higher loaf you
can (if your machine permits) program for a longer rise time, or simply
remove the dough from the pan after the final rise cycle (but before
baking) transfer it to a bread pan and allow it to raise in a warm place
until doubled in bulk. Then bake it in the oven. Sweet dough’s with lots
of butter and eggs also respond well to a second long rise in a cool
place. I remove my brioche from the machine after the dough cycle is
complete. I place it in a large freezer strength zip lock bag and
refrigerate it overnight. Then I place it back in the machine (my
Zojirushi has flexible programming), program for 2nd rise and bake. If
you can't program your machine this way you can place the dough in a
bread pan after you remove it from the machine, give it a long,
refrigerated rise, and then bake it in the oven. Even non-wheat and
non-sweet dough’s can benefit from this extra rise.

~~~~
No Yeast Bread

Yeast Replacement

This works good just uses the same amount as you use yeast

1 c Lecithin granules
1 tbs. Vitamin C powder
1 tbs. Ginger, ground

Mix all ingredients and store in tightly closed glass jar.  Add to breadmaker in
amount equal to yeast with other dry ingredients.  Start machine.  Apparently,
the ginger gooses the yeast and makes it act more swiftly, the ascorbic acid
strengthens the gluten, and the lecithin aids the oil in causing the strands of
gluten to slip against each other more easily and thus rise better.

Diane
--------------------------------------------------------------------- 
From: 		"C. M. D'Orazio" <catsfoot@sprint.ca>
Subject: 	Bread Machine
	
Robin’s Bread Recipe

Bread Machine:

Basic Bread

1 c. brown rice flour
1 c. white rice flour
1/4 c. potato flour
3/4 c. tapioca flour
2 tbs. soy flour
2 1/2 tsp. xanthan gum
1/2 c. nonfat dry milk
2 1/2 tsp. salt
2 tbs. sugar
1 tbs. plus 2 tsp. yeast
1 1/2 c. water
1 1/2 tsp. apple cider vinegar
1/2 cup Egg Beaters (or 2 whole eggs)

(I use the egg beaters and the nonfat dry milk to make the bread
virtually fat-free. There is some fat in some of the flours, especially the soy,
but I only use 2 T.)

1. Combine last 3 ingredients and put into bread machine pan (in my machine, the
wet ingredients are put in first. Check your instructions to see what yours
says).

2. Mix the remaining ingredients together in a bowl until well mixed and then
add to the bread machine pan.

3. Bake on basic loaf cycle with a medium crust.
~~~
Walrus Bread

1 c. garbanzo bean flour
1 1/2 c. rice flour
1/2 c. potato starch flour
3 tsp. Xanthum gum
1 tsp. salt
2 tbs. sugar
1 tbs. dry yeast (Red Star)
2  eggs
2 tbs. vegetable oil
1 tsp. white vinegar
1 1/3 c. hot water

Mix first 7 ingredients in a large bowl.
No need to sift if you don't want to).
In another bowl mix eggs, oil, vinegar and water.
Mix liquid into dry ingredients.
Spoon into bread machine. Set on light or medium setting.  Bake.
This will make 1 1/2 lb. of bread.
The person that I got the recipe from makes hers’ on the medium setting.  She
tried the light but preferred the medium.  That's what I tasted and it was
good!
~~~
YEAST DOUGH BREADFREEZING

1. Unbaked yeast dough may be frozen.  The best stage to freeze yeast dough is
before the final rising period.  Mix and knead dough and let it rise the first
time.  Punch down dough and shape into the desired shape and freeze.  It may be
made into nonspecific shapes and shaped after it has thawed.

2. To thaw:  If already shaped into final shape, thaw frozen dough in the
cooking pan.  Thaw at room temperature about 3 hours or in the refrigerator
overnight.

3. If not shaped into the final form, place in refrigerator to thaw 8 hours or
overnight.  Let the dough then stand at room temperature about 15 minutes to
warm slightly before shaping.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Yeast For Bread Machines

Hand made bread = Active Dry Yeast (needs proofing)

Machine made bread = Instant Active Dry Yeast or Bread Machine Yeast

Quick made bread = Rapid Rise Yeast (requires a shorter cycle)

Adjust yeast according to the recipe and machine being used. The
consistency of the dough and the amount of yeast will determine whether
the loaf will be tall or short.
--------------------------------------------------------------------- 
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Copyright 1999 by Michael Jones, Bill Elkus, Jim Lyles, and Lisa Lewis - All rights reserved worldwide.

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This fact sheet has been designed to be a general information resource. However, it is not intended for use in diagnosis, treatment, or any other medical application. Questions should be directed to your personal physician. This information is not warranted and no liability is assumed by the author or any group for the recommendations, information, dietary suggestions, menus, and recipes promulgated. Based upon accepted practices in supplying the source documents, this fact sheet is accurate and complete. Products mentioned or omitted do not constitute endorsement.

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