Celiac Recipes from 1998

Copyright by Michael Jones, Bill Elkus, Jim Lyles, and Lisa Lewis 1998 - All rights reserved worldwide.
Disclaimer
These recipes were posted to the Celiac List during 1998. Ingredients can change or local adaptions may not be available in other areas, so caution is recommended in the use of any ingredient. These recipes have not been indepently tested for accuracy.

 

Table of Contents

Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~

None

Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~

Pancakes

Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~

ShortBread (4) Orange Honey Quick Bread Pumpkin Bread Bread Baking Rising Area Bread Mix Summary: lefse recipes Bread from Whole Rice Bread recipe Sally's Forgiving Quick Muffins Bread Recipe Eleanor's Banana Bread An excellent substitute for crackers Corn Bread Hockey Puck Bread

Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~

Peach/Apricot Jello Mold Mushroom Soup/Summary

Entries~Entries~Entries~Entries~Entries~Entries~Entries~Entries~Entries~Entries~

Crispy oven-fried chicken Sweet and Sour Meatballs Spinach Squares (or balls) Bul Kogi (Korean Barbecued Beef) Stovetop Potato Broccoli and Mushroom Quiche Alfredo (4)

Side Dishes~Side Dishes~Side Dishes~Side Dishes~Side Dishes~Side Dishes~

Potato "Knishes" Cooking Rice foolproof method for cooking rice Rice Cookers POLENTA (CORNMEAL)

Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~

Summary/coffee cake toppers Chocolate Roll Chocolate Turtles Candy Hazelnut Cookies Orange Chocolate chip cookies Hamentashen (2) Chocolate Chip Cookies Peanutbutter cookies Ladyfingers Hamenstashen Responses Birthday Cake summary Puddle Cake MOIST COCOA-LENTIL CAKE CHOCOLATE CAKE Whipped Cream Cake CHOCOLATE FUDGE CAKE YELLOW BUTTERMILK CAKE ROYAL PECAN CHOCOLATE GATEAU BLACK MAGIC CAKE BANANA DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE CHOCOLATE SOUFFLE ROLL APPLESAUCE CAKE White Cake Summary for German chocolate cake Great hazelnut cockies: Apple Struesel Pie APPLE BUTTERSCOTCH TAPIOCA Double Fudge Saucepan Brownies Dark Velvet Torte Chocolate Cake Cookies with an Easter message Blueberry tofu "Yogurt/Ice Cream" TOFU BANANA COCONUT ICE CREAM PUMPKIN TOFU ICE CREAM PUMPKIN CUSTARD

Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~

Beer Summary Hot Spiced Wine (German Gluhwein)

Miscelleanous~Miscelleanous~Miscelleanous~Miscelleanous~Miscelleanous~

Cooking with Coconut milk ASIAN TAPIOCA PUDDING "Special K" Bars garbonzo bean summary> Cocktail Sauce Summary Teriyaki Summary (& Chinese) Pumpkin recipes Soup (2) Pudding risotto Stew Rice Flour Summary Matzoh - store bought / home made Gravy - Summary LECITHIN summary Substitution of flour in recipes...summary Measuring Gluten Free Flour: Muffin top bake pans/Summary

Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~Appetizers~

Subject: None
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Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~Breakfast~

From: Sharon (slars@CJNETWORKS.COM) Subject: Pancakes 1 1/4 cups rice flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 1/4 cup buttermilk or sour cream (I use liquid--not made from powder--buttermilk) 2 eggs 1/4 cup vegetable oil Add the vegetable oil to buttermilk. In large bowl, mix together all dry ingredients. Add the buttermilk/oil mixture and eggs. Mix and cook on hot griddle. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads~Breads

From: Jane Smith (jmg7664@BC3.CC.PA.US) Subject: Shortbread summary Here's a summary for a message I posted requesting shortbread recipes. Unfortunately I have not yet had a chance to try any of them. You know how the holidays go. One person suggested Pamela's Pecan Shortbread (available in health food stores) One suggested Bette Hagman's shortbread recipe in one of her books--but another said that she didn't care for it. Another suggested the recipe in Jacqueline Mallorca"s "The Wheat-Free Kitchen." Shortbread recipe #1 (adapted from a recipe from a Scottish grandmother): Weigh the following ingredients: 7 ounces softened butter 6 ounces gf flour mix (Hagmans was suggested) 3 ounces rice flour 3 ounces cornstarch 3 ounces sugar Rub dry ingredients into butter. Knead until soft. Press into tins (3 8" cake tins work well). Crimp edges and prick the surface with a fork. Bake at 325 F about 1/2 hour until golden brown. Score with a sharp knife and sprinkle with sugar. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Shortbread recipe #2 (from England): Heat oven to 350F or 180C. 110G (4 oz) gluten free flour mix 50g (2 oz) cornflour 110g (4 oz) butter 50g (2 oz) caster sugar Sift the mix and the cornflour. Add the sugar. Rub in the butter until the mixture starts to bind together to form a dough. Knead it slightly until it is smooth and soft. Place the dough in a 18 cm (7 inch) flan ring or a baking tray and press evenly to fit the ring. (Or roll the dough out to a 1 cm thickness and cut into rounds or fingers--bake 10-15 min) Mark the round with the back of a knife into 8 triangles and bake for 15-20 min. until light golden brown. Sprinkle with sugar. Cool before removing from tin. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Shortbread recipe #3 This sender suggested that these basic cookies could "pass" as shortbread. 1 c. sugar 1 c. softened butter 1 egg 2 c. gf flour mix 1 t. vanilla (optional) Mix and bake (375 F for 9 minutes) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Jane Smith (jmg7664@BC3.CC.PA.US) Subject: More shortbread Hi all. I found one other shortbread recipe I managed to leave out of my summary. The ingredients were listed in U.S. measurements when I received it. I'm going to try to convert them and include both--BUT since they were originally by volume, so are the conversions. I was at a loss as to how to get them into weight measurements. I am far from a mathematician! And thanks to those of you who sent me recipes from other printed sources. I'm not including those here, though, because I'm personally uncomfortable with posting copyrighted materials in such a public forum. 1/2 c. cornstarch (118 ml.) 1/2 c. powdered (confectioners) sugar (118 ml.) 1 c. white rice flour (236 ml.) 3/4 c. butter (177 ml.) Sift dry ingredients. Rub butter in by hand. Refrigerate for one hour. Roll into balls and place 1/2 inch apart on ungreased cookie sheet. Press with fork. Bake at 300 F (150 C) for 20 minutes. NOTE: For those of you who may never have made shortbread in either your pre-Celiac days or in your current incarnation, purists insist on using butter--no substitutes. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Ellen (asher@PACINFO.COM) Subject: Orange Honey Quick Bread Dry Ingredients: 1 cup white rice flour 1 cup brown rice flour 1/2 cup tapioca flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon xantham gum 3/4 cup fine chopped pecans or hazelnuts or walnuts Wet Ingredients: 2 tablespoons softened butter or margarine 3/4 cup honey 2 egg whites or 1 egg, beaten 3/4 cup orange juice 1+1/2 tablespoon grated orange rind Mix together the dry ingredients with a wire wisk. Mix the wet ingredients separately, then combine with the dry, and mix well. Pour into a greased medium-size loaf pan. Bake at 325 degrees for about 1 hour. Let the bread cool for 10 minutes before removing it from the pan. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Naomi King (nking@JAVANET.COM) Subject: Pumpkin Bread Someone requested that a recipe for gluten-free pumpkin bread using a whole 14-oz. can of pumpkin puree be posted. I apologize for taking a bit to respond, but this recipe makes a moist, dense pumpkin bread. If you like spices, you will want to increase even further the amount of spicing. Good luck. I used the coarser white and brown rice flours, rather than Oriental rice flour. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Oil a regular sized loaf pan. Mix well together: one 14-oz. can pumpkin puree 1/4 cup molasses 1/4 cup honey 3/4 cup yogurt (I use homemade) 3 tsp. ground cinnamon 1+1/2 tsp. ground ginger 3/4 tsp. ground cloves 1 tsp. xanthan gum Sift together in small bowl: 1/3 cup tapioca starch 1/3 cup potato starch 1/3 cup white rice flour 1/2 cup brown rice flour 1+1/2 tsp. baking soda Blend the flour mixture into the wet ingredient mixture until well combined. Fold into the bread mixture: 1/3 cup currants 1/2 cup chopped walnuts Pour into prepared loaf pan; bake at 350 degrees F. in the middle of the oven for 50-65 minutes. The batter will be thick, heavier than pancake batter but looser than yeasted dough. You are looking for the bread to be done when the batter no longer will jiggle and the crust is crispy brown. If you bake it until you can remove a toothpick cleanly, the bread will be overdone and dry. When the loaf is removed from the oven, place a folded tea towel over the top to absorb extra moisture. Allow to cool at least 30 minutes before slicing. I slice my loaf into eight to twelve slices. Delicious with nut butters, alone, and with cream cheese. N.B.: I bake at sea level in humid conditions. You may need to adjust this batter for high altitudes and dry conditions. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Bruce Culver (bruce.v.culver@worldnet.att.net) Subject: Bread Baking Rising Area Teresa, Douglas, Anne and Ruth suggested boiling a cup of water in the microwave and then putting the bread pan in the microwave to let it rise draft-free! (I did it and it worked!) Anne and Sherri suggested putting the bread pan on top of the refrigerator as heat rises in the room and the refrigerator itself is warm on the outside. David and Christian, who have ovens with continuous fans also, suggested setting the oven to 100 degrees F (40 degrees C) and enclosing the bread pan in a large polythene bag. Christian just covers it with a damp cloth. Mary suggested using a heating pad set on low and Ellen uses a hot water bottle next to the bread pan and covered all up. Margaret, Linda and Sandra suggested covering and putting the breadpan on top of the clothes dryer when doing a load of laundry. Margaret said she'd even heard of putting the covered bread pan inside the previously used (empty) dryer and using the left-over heat that way. (Don't write with any jokes, she beat you to it: "Puts a different angle to making rolls.") Teresa also suggested putting the breadpan, covered, in the smallest room of the house, closing the door and letting the heat of the furnace warm up the closed room. Linda said with her free-standing stove, she puts the bread pan on a cookie sheet, covers it, and places it on the back burner of the stove where heat will escape from the back of the oven. Sue suggested a sunny spot near a window. Sherry suggested several: a shelf over a heater, radiator or stove; a large pan of hot water on the oven floor; on a rack above a sink full of hot water; in a styrofoam cooler with a jug of hot water (and also stated that the temperature should be around 70-80 degrees F). Celeste said to partially fill the kitchen sink with hot water. Invert a glass bowl in the sink and place the breadpan on top of the inverted bowl. Then cover the entire sink with a cloth to retain the moisture. Sandra has placed the covered breadpan in her warm garage. And to top it off, Val (who lives here in sunny Florida) suggested putting the covered bread pan in the car parked outside with the windows rolled up! (As she warned, "Just don't forget about it and let someone drive off with it!" Ha!) These are all great ideas and VERY creative--which we have to be in our situations! Thanks to all! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Andrea Gould (amgould@JUNO.COM) Subject: Bread Mix By Bob Meeham 2 cups white rice flour 11/4 cups of bean flour 21/2 tsp Xanthan Gum 3 Tbsp sugar 11/2 tsp salt 1 Tbsp Egg Replacer 1/2 dry milk 1 large egg or 2 egg whites 1 tsp cider vinegar 3 tbsp oil 11/2 c of warm water 1 pkt of yeast I substituted Jowar flour for the white rice flour, used dairyfree dry instead of dry milk and used 1 and 1/2 pkt of yeast leaving the rest of the recipe the same. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Elizabeth Bartilson (bartilso@PILOT.MSU.EDU) Subject: Summary: lefse recipes For those who don't know what lefse is, it is a Norwegian "treat" that looks like a mexican flour tortilla with spots. It has a very mild flavor and is usually (at least in my family) eaten with butter instead of bread at a meal, or with butter and sugar as a snack. -------------- 5 Large Potatoes 1/2 cup sweet cream 1 teaspoon salt 3 tablespoons butter enough flour to roll out (I use Bette Hagmans GF Blend) about 1/2 c. maximum Method: Boil potatoes, mash very fine and add cream, butter and salt. Beat until light and let cool. Add flour. Take piece of dough and roll as for pie crust, rolling thin as possible. (My Note: A lefse board is handy here) Bake on top of stove or on a pancake griddle until a light brown, turning frequently to prevent scorching. Use moderate heat. When baked, place between clean cloths to keep them from becoming dry. --------------- I have a lefse recipe that I have yet to try, although I plan to try it in a week or two. 3 cups riced potatoes 2 tablespoons lard 2 tablespoons milk 1/3 cup potato flour 1 tablespoon tablespoon xantham gum salt Roll into ball while warm. Let cool and roll using brown rice flour. Bake on grill. -------------------------- 2 lbs. potatoes, pared 1/2 cup light cream (I use milk) 3 Tbls. butter 1 tsp. salt flour Boil potatoes until tender; drain thoroughly; mash. Beat in cream, butter and salt. Cool to room temperature. Measure potatoes. Add 1/2 cup flour for each cup of mashed potatoes; mix well. Roll out a heaping tablespoonful of dough (about the size of a small egg) on a VERY well-floured surface to a 6-inch circle. (I dip the dough in the flour, turn it over, and roll as thinly as possible.) Heat an ungreased griddle over moderate heat until hot. (Water should sizzle when dropped on griddle.) Cook lefse over moderate heat until light brown, turning frequently to keep from overbrowning. Lefse will bubble up; press down with pancake turner. You will need to wipe your griddle periodically to get rid of the excess flour. As each lefse is cooked, place between paper toweling or wax paper to keep soft. To serve, spread with softened butter and sprinkle with cinnamon-sugar. (My son loves to roll it around Swedish meatballs.) When I made them GF, I just substituted Bette Hagman's GF flour mix for the regular flour and rolled them out in rice flour. They looked fine, but lacked flavor. Maybe using some soy or bean flour would help. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Art Raiche (Art.Raiche@MQ.EDU.AU) Subject: Bread recipe 1 cup brown rice flour 1 banana 1 cup buckwheat flour 1 apple 2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda 300 ml milk or water 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 2 eggs 1/2 teaspoon tartaric acid 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 bread tin about 30cm by 11 cm, by 8 cm deep Use food processor to beat fruit, milkand eggs into puree. Mix the dry ingredients, ading the oil. Fold the puree into the dry ingredients and mix gently. (DON'T BEAT TOO MUCH.) Put into 200°C oven and cook for about 45 minutes. Test with cake probe Then experiment by ading chopped dates and poppy seeds (no need to chop them) For me, the crucial part is the nutrition gained by using these flours. One writer complained about grit taste from BR flour. One persons grit is another ones texture I suppose. Bessan (chick pea flour) is also nutritous but I don't like it as well. An alternative is millet flour. Try the above and then change it to suit your tastes. Play around a bit and enjoy the results. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Sally Lopez (slopez@erols.com) Subject: Sally's Forgiving Quick Muffins (Recipe will be for 1/2 dozen -- doubles easily!) Preheat the oven to about 400-425 (my oven thermostat is whacky!) Combine the following in a bowl: 1/2 cup milk (I use 2%) 1 beaten egg 1 1/2 tbs sugar (less or more depending on what you like) 1/2 tsp salt (can leave out if wish) Put in a microwavable coffee cup: 2 tbs shortening (I use regular old tub margarine-Country Crock) Put coffee cup in microwave. Cover with a paper towel. Put in microwave for just a few seconds at a time until melted. Dont' microwave for 1-2 minutes or it will spatter all over your microwave making a big mess! When it has melted, let it cool a little before adding or the hot fat will fry the egg!) Mix in separate bowl: (Here's the fun part!) The goal is to get a total of 1 cup of "flour." The recipe uses three flours: rice (white or brown), sweet rice, *corn flour. The rice flours are available at Asian markets. The corn flour is available at Indian/Middle Eastern markets (this is corn flour, not corn meal, and it is essential for the muffins.) Alternative #1 -- To make a "corn" muffin: Put 1-2 tbs of sweet rice flour in a one-cup measuring cup. Fill up the remainder of the measuring cup with rice flour and corn flour (but a little heavy on the corn flour (perhaps 60% corn, 40% rice). Remember the goal is to get 1 cup of "flour". To this, add 1/4 cup grated cheese or berries or whatever you like in your corn muffins. Then go to the last step (adding the baking powder) below. Alternative #2 -- To make more of a "dinner roll": Put 1/2 tbs of sweet rice flour in a one-cup measuring cup. Fill up the remainder of the measuring cup with rice flour and corn flour (but a little heavy on the rice flour (perhaps 60% rice, 40% corn). Remember the goal is to get 1 cup of "flour". You can experiment with the three flours. The corn flour is essential. I have not had the same success when I've substituted tapioca, potato starch, etc. Then go to theh last step (adding the baking powder) below: Mix sugar, salt, egg, milk mixture together with the flour Add the cooled shortening or margarine. Add the one cup of "flour" and stir just enough to moisten the ingrediants (should still be lumpy). Spray your muffin tin with Pam. Check to see that you oven has heated up. If so, quickly add 1 1/2 tsp baking power. Mix a few strokes and *quickly* spoon into muffin tin. In other words don't add the baking powder until you are sure that you are going to make the muffins. If I premake the mix, I add the baking powder just before I plan to bake the muffins! Bake for about 10-12 minutes or until brown on top! The oven temperature is pretty forgiving, too. Adjust the time dedpending on the heat of your oven. When the top is golden brown, you'll know they are done! Other suggestions: Same recipe makes great pancakes add a little more milk (haven't tried waffles yet!) To make a breakfast muffin, add more sugar, cinnamon and nuts. Frost with a mix of powdered sugar, few drops of milk, and a tsp of heated margarine! Makes wonderful cinnamon muffins. To make a bun or sandwich bread use English muffin rings or "muffin top" pan. Add a little rice bran (health food store) for a nutty high fiber muffin. Perhaps people who have other suggestions could let me know and I will save and post soon. Please let me know about other sources of corn flour (not corn meal) and I will also post (I am very close to an Indian market and they have wonderful finely-ground corn flour). One friends has included jalapeno peppers and cheese in the corn muffin recipe for a southwestern muffin. Fruits, raisens, nuts, etc., can be added as you like. Decrease the amount of milk accordingly if the fruit is very juicy. I haven't had a bad batch yet. This is easy, quick, and can probably be done by kids (under supervision). You can probably have fresh muffins most every day. Good luck and enjoy. The muffin batter should be thick (like pancake batter) not thin. Since different flours have different consistencies, add a few teaspoons more until it is like thick pancake batter. I had cinamin muffins tonight as a treat! If anyone encounters problems with this recipe just let me know and I'll try to figure out what is going wrong. Sally --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Art Raiche (Art.Raiche@MQ.EDU.AU) Subject: bread recipe In response to a number of private requests, here is the recipe for the bread. It was taken from an excellent book called Gluten Free Cooking by Peter Thompson, Hoddart & Staughton, ISBN 0 340 62098-6 I enclose our modified recipe for bread taken from the book. (You have to acount for the fact that the author is British) Clearly alternatives will suggest themselves but may I suggest that you stick to the recipe exactly the first time. The bread is very easy to make, about 5 to 10 minutes. It is much more nutritious than most but at the same time, almost more like a cake than a bread. 1 cup brown rice flour 1 banana 1 cup buckwheat flour 1 apple 2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda 300 ml milk or water 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 2 eggs ½ teaspoon tartaric acid 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 bread tin about 30cm by 11 cm, by 8 cm deep Use food processor to beat fruit, milkand eggs into puree. Mix the dry ingredients, ading the oil. Fold the puree into the dry ingredients and mix gently. (DON'T BEAT TOO MUCH.) Put into 200°C oven and cook for about 45 minutes. Test with cake probe Then experiment by ading chopped dates and poppy seeds (no need to chop them) For me, the crucial part is the nutrition gained by using these flours. One writer complained about grit taste from BR flour. One persons grit is another ones texture I suppose. Bessan (chick pea flour) is also nutritous but I don't like it as well. An alternative is millet flour. Try the above and then change it to suit your tastes. Play around a bit and enjoy the results. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ From: Amy Wordelman (awordelm@SOPHIA.SMITH.EDU) Subject: Bread from Whole Rice This is the bread recipe I have gradually developed over the last seven years. I start with whole short grain brown rice, rather than rice flour. I've found that I don't need any other binders such as xanthan gum or eggs. It makes a bread about 1 and a half inches high, that holds together well. I slice it horizontally for sandwiches and toast. Note that there is no added yeast in this recipe, but it is not yeast-free because it collects yeast from the air as it sets before baking. I also have this recipe posted on my personal web site at: http://www.javanet.com/~loehr/a/gluten.htm Ingredients: 3 cups short grain brown rice (Long grain brown rice may be used, but it will produce a much drier bread.) 3 cups cold water 3/4 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 teaspoon gluten-free baking powder (optional, see recipe instructions) -- Ideally baked in a well-seasoned ten-inch iron skillet with a heavy glass cover (makes a flat round loaf you can slice horizontally for sandwiches). A covered casserole dish of similar size will also work, but the dish needs to be well-oiled, preferably with an oil/soy lecithin mixture or a gluten-free non-stick spray. Instructions: 1.Place the rice and the water in a large bowl, cover with a light cloth or napkin, and allow the rice to soak in the water for 8-12 hours (overnight or all day). If you are going to use a blender in step 2, it works best to soak the rice in two separate containers with 1 and 1/2 cups of rice and water in each container. 2. Grind the rice into a batter using either a blender or a food processor. If using a blender, place half the water and rice mixture in the blender and blend on high speed for 1-2 minutes. To see if the rice is sufficiently ground, rub a small bit of the batter between your fingers. The liquid should fall away leaving small bits of rice with the texture of table salt. Repeat using the other half of the rice/water mixture. If using a food processor with a four a more cups capacity, place the entire rice and water mixture in the processor and grind on high for 8-12 minutes. 3.After grinding place the batter in a large mixing bowl and cover with a light cloth or napkin. The cover must allow air to reach the batter so that it can ferment naturally with the help of yeasts it collects from the air. At a room temperature of 68 to 72 degrees, you can allow the batter to set anywhere from 4 to 24 hours, depending upon your taste in bread: 4-6 hours:very mild yeast flavor, add baking powder right before baking 8-12 hours: mild yeast flavor, add baking powder right before baking 18-24 hours:strong yeast flavor comparable to wheat breads, batter expands because of carbon dioxide bubbles below surface, baking powder is optional (I rarely use it) After the dough sets more than 24 hours it will begin to develop a distinct sourdough flavor. If the room temperature is high, like 80 degree days without air-conditioning, the setting time will be speeded up considerably. 4.After the batter has set for the desired amount of time, stir well, mixing in the salt and the baking powder (if using). Place the batter in a well-oiled pan, cover and bake covered for 50-55 minutes at 350 degrees --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Beth A Vanderveen (vdveen@JUNO.COM) Subject: Eleanor's Banana Bread (removed due to copyright resrictions) --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Susan Pieper (spieper@HUNTEL.COM) Subject: An excellent substitute for crackers It started with a loaf of Miss Roben's white bread that was too white, and too bread, if you know what I mean! I sliced it extremely thin, spread the slices out on an extra-large cookie sheet, melted some butter and brushed it on the tops of the slices, put the whole thing in a 225 degree oven, left the oven on for a couple of hours, then turned the oven off and left the pan in the hot oven overnight. This process turned the bread into melba toast or zweiback, whichever you want to call it! I next tried the process with some Authentic Foods bread that wasn't exactly my greatest success. That's even better! I had a few slices of the Authentic Foods cinnamon bread, and that was the most like commercial zweiback (yes, the baby stuff--one of my secret vices!) Anyway, this extra-crunchy toast makes a wonderful treat with tea or cocoa, or just for relieving the munchies. I suspect it'd work well for pregnant folks too. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: David J Walland (David.Walland@bristol.ac.uk) Subject: Corn Bread 50 g polenta 50 g corn flour 175 g fine corn meal 75 g unpolished sesame seeds 3 tbs glutinous rice powder (this is exceptionally fine and obtained from our local Chinese supermarket) 2 tbs oil (I use virgin olive oil but I expect other oil will do) 0.5 tsp salt 0.5 tsp honey 250 ml water 1 medium egg 1 tbs dried yeast Mix the glutinous rice flour and oil together, heat and add 100 mls water. Stir and cook until a revolting substance (like worn out chewing gum which has had an accident) is produced. Take off the heat and leave to cool. Make up 150 mls of water to 40C, add the honey and dried yeast and leave in a warm place to start working. Once the glutinous flour mix is cool enough to start working with, add the sesame seed and mix in. In a reasonably sized bowl (this takes a bit of working) measure up the other dry ingredients, and mix well. Mix in the glutinous rice mass and clean up the pan with part of the dry corn flour mix, until as much as possible of the mix is now in the bowl. Mix the rice flour mass and the dry ingredients together until you get a crumb-like structure. Add the egg and the yeast mix, once the latter is working well. Mix well until a smooth dropping consistency is achieved. Pour the mix into a greased and floured bread form (I used polenta to flour mine this was a mistake as it left the outside of the loaf slightly gritty). Allow to rise until the bread form is nearly filled by the mix. Bake at 200C for 45 min. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Pixilated@WORLDNET.ATT.NET Subject: Hockey Puck Bread 2 cups rice flour 2 cups tapioca flour 1/4 cup rice bran 1 1/2 tsp. salt 3 1/2 tsp. xanthan gum 1/4 cup sugar 1 tbl. egg replacer 1/4 cup olive oil 1 cup water(-2 tbl.) 4 teas. yeast 1 cup very warm water plus 1tbl. sugar 3 eggs 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 2/3 cup powdered milk Combine warm water and yeast.Set a side. Combine dry ingredients.Add oil, eggs, and water.Then add yeast mixture.Mix well,add vinegar. Mix well(about 2 or 3 min.) Spoon into greased muffin top pan ( I use PAM ). I have a high power mixer (kitchenaid). Another mixer may require more beating.Bake 325* about 15 min. or until brown.Split when cool. Rise 25 minutes in a warm oven I didn't have this written down ,straight out of my head.I sometimes use all white rice and sometimes 1/4 brown rice flour . My kids don't seem to care. I rarely eat bread. Sometimes I add a little onion powder. Hope it works for everyone else. ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~Salads/Soups~

From: Lynn Samuel (samueJ@AOL.COM) Subject: Peach/Apricot Jello Mold 2 C boiling water 1 large or 2 small pkg. peach or apricot jello 1 lb. g-f small curd cottage cheese (I used Royal Sugar Free Peach) g-f mini marshmallows - 1- 8 oz. Container Cool Whip (amount to your liking) (can use lower fat or light) Mix jello and boiling water, then cool in refrigerator until jelly consistency. Then beat in Cool Whip, and cottage cheese-- which has been put in a blender or whisked, then strained to drain liquid. Add mini marshmallows. Spray a jello mold with Pam, pour in mixture and chill overnight. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Pixilated@WORLDNET.ATT.NET Mushroom Soup/Summary CREAM OF 'WHATEVER' SOUP (use soup base given below) Cream Cream Cream Cream of of of of Tomato Mushroom Chicken Celery Mix: 1/4 c. soup 1/3 c. soup 1/3 c. soup 1/3 c.soup base base base base With: 3/4 c. cold 3/4 c. cold 1 c. cold 1 c. cold water water water water Add: 1/2 cup 1-4 oz. can 1/3 cup 1/2 cup tomato mushrooms, finely finely paste undrained & chopped minced minced chicken celery Season 1/2 t. paprika 2 t. chicken 2 t. chicken 1 t. butter with: 1/4 t. celery boullion boullion 2 t. chicken salt 1 t. butter 1/4 t. dried boullion 1 t. butter Dash of nutmeg parsley 1/4 t. celery Dash of salt celery salt Directions: Mix and heat over medium heat, stirring constantly, until smooth. Lower heat and continue cooking for 5-10 minutes more, stirring occassionally. At this point, use as directed in place of a can of cream soup. For eating, add 8-10 ounces of additional water when heating. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Mushroom soup: Mushrooms can be chopped in own juice in a blender. Celery Soup: Simmer celery in 1 t. butter with a little water in a covered pan until tender, 5-10 minutes. It may be necessary to add more water. The water should be almost evaporated before adding to recipe. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Quick Mix Casserole: Mix all casserole ingredients and bring to a boil on top of stove. Mix 1/4 to 1/3 cup soup base with an additional 1 cup water. Add to hot ingredients, stir until thick. Turn into baking dish, bake as usual. (Rice cooks slow in the soup base--best to add soup when rice is almost done mixing dry base w/ about 1 c. additional cold water.) * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * SOUP BASE Mix well: 2 cups nonfat dried milk 1/2 cuppotato starch 1/2 cup cornstarch 2 Tbs. dried minced onion 1/2 tsp. black pepper Store in refrigerator. Using half cornstarch and half potato starch gives a nice consistency. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Here's a quick and easy recipe for mushroom soup: 1 can sliced mushrooms 2 can of whole milk mix and heat to just about boiling add 1 or 2 Tablespoons of potato flour pre-mixed with cold water simmer on low heat till the potato flour cooks. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ FROM TWO I RECEIVED THIS ADVICE.... See Betty Hagman's second book for a mix to keep on hand for cream soups. AND Also.... I don't know of a GF brand that exists, but the recipe in Bette Hagman's "Gluten-Free Gourmet" page 143 is very good. When I make it, I use milk instead of cream. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Looked on my list of GF products from a celiac support group. Progresso (as of July 1996) has a cream of mushroom soup and Lipton - Cup-a-Soup has a cream of Mushroom (comes in packet and use must add water). I have been using the Lipton's brand for lunch with no problems. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Walnut Acres Organic Farms (Penna Creek, PA 17862)makes a very good gluten free Cream of mushroom soup. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I don't know of a GF cream of mushroom soup. I could not find one to use in cassarole recipes, so instead I use potato soup. I just cook a bunch of potatos in water, add some salt and onion powder, and put it in my Vita-Mixer. It might work to run it through a blender or food processor.I don't really have a recipe because I just throw it together when I need it. It has worked great in tuna cassarole and my kids like it better than mushroom soup anyway. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ EnerG sells a GF cream of mushroom soup mix; it is not free and is a poor match for Campbell's, but it is GF ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Cream of Mushroom soup is so easy. I saute onion, and garlic and the mushrooms. Add heated milk that I've added about 1tbs per cup cornstarch to and let simmer until thickened. If it's still not thick enough, more cornstarch or rice or tapioca flour will thicken it in a hurry. Same with cream of celery soup. Then add salt and pepper to taste and your in business! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Here is what I use when a recipe calls for cream of mushroom soup. 1 cup non-fat dried milk powder 1/2 tsp dried basil 1 Tbsp dried onion flakes 1/2 tsp dried thyme 2 Tbsp cornstarch 1/4 tsp black pepper 1 Tbsp chicken bouillon powder ( I use Herb Ox) This is for a dry mix that can be stored in an airtight container and kept on hand until needed. When you're ready for soup just add 2 cups of cold water and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until it thickens. For cream of mushroom add some sliced mushrooms a few minutes before removing from the stove. I have tried several combinations of spices and other vegetables also ( asparagus is great). This is neat to have on hand when you need a quick meal. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Again, thank's to all for your help. I ended up making my own based on several of the ideas above. Mine was fat free and milk free. 2 cups fresh crimini mushrooms (sliced) 1 large onion (minced) 2 - 3 foil pouches of G. Washington's Golden seasoning 6 cups water. 8 tbs of Better Than Milk powder + 2 tbs. cornstarch (mixed into the water) OR one box MoriNu Lite silken tofu **** (see below) **** 1 tbs. dried parsley flakes. Salt and pepper to taste. Saute onions and mushrooms in 1/2 cup of the water. Add seasonings, and water mixed with dry ingredients (as per above). Simmer for approximately 15 to 20 minutes. Let rest for at least three hours to develop flavor. **** if using the tofu, then add 1 cup of your water to the tofu in a blender and blend on high till completely creamed. Stir into pot and then simmer. I made this and added some to a brown rice and broccoli caserole. It was pretty good (or at least my husband said it was :) ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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From: Opie431 (Opie431@AOL.COM) Subject: Crispy oven-fried chicken Dip chicken in egg or water and then roll in crushed potato chip and corn chip crumbs. Bake in the overn for 50 minutes at 350 degrees and you get wonderful crispy chicken. I do not add exra salt to the chicken. I have also added some cheese curls to the crumb mixture. Corn or rice cereal can also be mixed in with the crumbs if you do not have enough but if you have to much of the cereal it loses the crispiness. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lynn Samuel (samueJ@AOL.COM) Subject: Sweet and Sour Meatballs 1 - 1 1/2 lb. lean ground beef g-f fine bread crumbs to your liking 1 large or 2 small eggs 1 jar Heinz Chili Sauce 1 pkg. Lipton dry onion soup mix 1 10 oz jar g-f grape jam, preserves, or jelly Beat egg until mixed. Add beef, soup mix and bread crumbs until consistency to form balls. May add salt and pepper if you like. Pan fry with Pam until browned. In another sauce pan, mix jelly and chili sauce. Add meatballs and heat over low/medium heat for about 30-45 minutes. Serve warm. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lynn Samuel (samueJ@AOL.COM) Subject: Spinach Squares (or balls) 1 10 oz. box frozen chopped spinach 1/4 C grated parmesan cheese 1 - 1 1/2 T olive oil 1/2 tsp. dried oregano 1/4 C finely chopped onion 1/2 tsp. dried basil 4 chopped/ mashed garlic cloves salt and pepper to taste 1 C fine dry g-f bread crumbs 2 eggs 1/4 C finely ground almonds or walnuts olive oil on top (optional) Cook spinach according to package directions and drain. Saute onion and garlic in olive oil. Add drained spinach and cook as needed to rid of excess water. Combine this mixture with rest of ingredients in a mixing bowl. Pat mixture in a greased shallow 8 or 9 square pan, or form balls. Optionally, spray top with olive oil. Bake @ 400 degrees F 20-30 minutes or until browned. Serve warm or room temperature. Broccoli can be used instead of spinach. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lynn Samuel (samueJ@AOL.COM) Subject: Bul Kogi (Korean Barbecued Beef) 4 T g-f soy sauce 1 tsp. Ginger (optional) 2 T salad oil dash ground pepper 2 T brown sugar 1-2 green onions minced (regular onion too) 1/2 tsp. Honey 1-2 cloves garlic minced Use 2 lbs. Chuck steak, well marbled with fat, cut into serving pieces or strips 1/4 by 4. Combine marinade ingredients, then meat. May be marinated for a few hours, but I do it for a few days! Broil or cook on grill, turning once. Takes 15-30 minutes, depending on meat size. Marinade good heated and poured over meat and rice when cooked. I MULTIPLIED THESE PROPORTIONS TIMES 4 for 9. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Karen Bulmer (kbulmer@CHA.AB.CA) Subject: Stovetop Potato Broccoli and Mushroom Quiche 2 stalks broccoli (about 3/4 lb in total) 3 eggs 1 1/4 cups light ricotta cheese 1/2 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese 2 tbsp GF flour 1/8 tsp black pepper 1/8 tsp nutmeg 1/3 cup milk 1 tbsp oil 2 cups thinly sliced parboiled potatoes (about 2 medium) or 2 cups precooked rice 1 1/2 cups sliced mushrooms 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese Remove broccoli heads and break or cut into small florets. Save stems another use. In a saucepan of rapidly boiling lightly salted water cook florets until just tender, about 2 minutes. Drain, set aside. In bowl, whisk together eggs, ricotta until blended. Whisk in parmesan cheese, flour, pepper and nutmeg. Stir in milk unti smooth. Set aside. Cover handle of nonstick 9 or 10 inch ovenproof frying pan with foil (if handle is wood or plastic). Add oil and heat, swirling pan to coat sides. Cover bottom of pan and partly up sides with potatoes, overlapping them, or rice. Cook 4 minutes on medium heat until undersides of potatoes are becoming golden. Cover potatoes/rice with broccoli and mushrooms, gently pour ricotta filling over. Cover and cook for 12 to 15 minutes or until edge is set. Sprinkle with cheddar and broil for about 3 minutes or until cheese is melted. Cool 10 minutes before cutting into wedges. Serves 4 to 6. Alternates; 1. Red pepper, green pepper, quartered kielbasa 2. broccoli, mushrooms, ham 3. Just about anything you can think of. Serve topped with fresh sliced tomatoes --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: GLiran (GLiran@AOL.COM) Subject: Alfredo 1.If you have access to canned soup (condensed) that is GF, then here is a recipe (I'm guessing on the measurements, as I usually just 'make it') 1 Can GF Cream of Mushroom Soup (condensed) 1 package fresh mushrooms Fresh cream or milk (1/2 cup approx.) Freshly Grated Parmesan 1 clove fresh Garlic, crushed Fresh parsley Fresh Ground Pepper - Sauté the mushrooms with crushed garlic and a little canola oil - Heat condensed soup over medium heat and add enough cream or milk to the consistency you desire. Heat through - Add about 1/4 C Fresh grated Parmesan - Add Sautéed Mushroom/Garlic mixture - simmer over low heat until heated through - stir in about 1 Tablespoon fresh parsley and fresh ground pepper to taste This is best served over noodles with a sprinkle of parmesan and is very rich. - If a thinner sauce is desired, add more cream/milk, but be careful not to add too much, or it will be too runny - Fresh or Frozen peas can be added to sauce for a variety - If you cannot find GF canned soup, then you can make your own base up starting with mushrooms and a little water sautéed together to get a really nice juice and then adding a little milk and cornstarch later to thicken ... For optimum flavor, this has to simmer for some time. ------------------- 2.The best but high fat recipe is 1/4c butter- melt in sauce pan 1c. whipping cream- add to butter and simmer until it thickens 1c. Parmesan cheese (freshly grated) - add and stir until combined. Season with salt and pepper and pour over cooked pasta. Low fat version 1c. low fat cottage cheese- whir in food processor until smooth 1/4c. parmesan cheese (freshly grated) 1/4c.milk 1 egg 1/4 tsp. nutmeg Add to food processor and whir until combined. Add to cooked pasta, cook over medium heat for 1 min, stirring constantly. Add cooked veggies, chicken or whatever you like to either sauce. --------------------- 3. Chicken Fettuccine 1 pkg. noodles 2 c. chopped cooked chicken meat 1 4 oz. can sliced mushrooms, drained 1/2 c. celery 1/2c. butter or marg. 1/2 c. light cream 1/2 c. grated Parmesan cheese 1 tsp. salt 3/4 tsp. coarse ground pepper Prepare noodles according to pkg. Drain. In medium skillet, cook and stir chicken, mushrooms and celery in butter, until celery is tender. Add cream and heat but do not boil. Toss together hot noodles, cream mixture, cheese, salt and pepper. Serve immediately on warm Platte. ---------------- 4. I have a great recipe although it is extremely rich!!! 2 sticks of butter 2 pints of heavy cream 2 cups of parmesan cheese 1 tbsp. of Parsley Melt the butter over a low flame when it is melted add the cream in. You should do this while your noodles are cooking because as soon as you add the cream you take it off of the stove and put it in with your noodles then add the cheese and the parsley. Make sure when you are adding the cream to the butter you mix it thoroughly this will help keep it from separating. I only make it about once every other month because it is so rich!!! Hope you enjoy it ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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Side Dishes~Side Dishes~Side Dishes~Side Dishes~SideDishes~Side Dishes~Side Dishes~

From: SamueJ (SamueJ@AOL.COM) Subject: Potato "Knishes" 1 large onion minced 3 eggs, slightly beaten 1 cup chicken fat (I used 1/2 margerine) 1 1/2 tsp salt 4 cups mashed potatoes 1/4 - 1/2 tsp pepper 1/2 cup potato flour Saute onion in 4 Tbl chicken fat (I used 1/2 margerine and 1/2 chicken fat) and cool. Add 1/2 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. Knead together remaining fat,potatoes, potato flour, eggs, salt and pepper. Using potato flour on rolling pin and board, roll out and cut into 2 inch squares. Place a tsp browned onions on each, fold and pinch edges together. Place on a greased baking sheet. Bake in a preheated oven at 375-400 degrees F for 25-35 minutes, (depending on actual size, as mine varied). The recipe as written makes about two dozen. These taste best when warm. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "G.L.Ayre" (glayre@netspeed.com.au) Subject: Cooking Rice Get a deep dish with a lid....I use a deep casserole dish. Boil water 1 cup of rice 2 cups of boiling water. 5 minutes in the microwave stir 5 more minutes in the microwave This is an absorbtion method. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "S. Pierce" (sydney2@u.washington.edu) Subject: foolproof method for cooking rice I've used the following method for cooking rice for years without difficulty. The pan doesn't matter--heavy cast-iron, lighter alumninum, etc.--so long as it has a lid. To make smaller or larger quantities, just adjust the amount of water and rice, remembering to use 1 1/2 times as much water as rice. 1. Put 3 cups of water, 2 cups of rice, and a dash of salt (optional) in a saucepan. Bring to a boil. 2. Lower heat to medium and cook until the water has boiled down to the level of the rice (leaving craters in rice--but don't panic, it WON'T boil away, and both the rice and pan are going to be fine). 3. Cover and turn heat to low. Cook for 20 minutes. 4. Uncover, and fluff with fork. You get perfect rice, every time. It is boring waiting for the water to boil away, but I just set the kitchen timer for 5 minutes when I lower the heat to medium, and come back and check it then. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Reesa Zuber (zuberrk@destiny.esd105.wednet.edu) Subject: Rice Here is the method that I use and it doesn't fail or burn or stick. I use an electric range. 2 parts water to 1 part rice. Salt optional. Bring the rice to a boil. Turn off the burner. Cover with a lid. Leave it set on the burner for 30 minutes. Perfect white rice. This will not work for brown rice as it takes longer to absorb the moisture. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Colby Ray (colbyr@NWLINK.COM) Subject: Rice cookers Recommended brands: Black & Decker (most popular) Zojirushi (2nd most popular) National Farberware Hitachi "Chime-O-Matic" Salton Sanyo Toshiba Master Cuisine Other suggestions: look for bread machine with rice cooking feature shop in Asian markets look for teflon coating Brands that people had problems with: Aroma (steam vent spits out very gluey water - BIG MESS!!!) brands with glass top and single vent hole Other suggestions: 1- cook veggies and even chicken in with the rice for whole dinner/lunch 2- take it with you when you travel - can use in motels, etc 3- very important to rinse rice before cooking - rinse until water runs clear I currently cook my rice in an old stovetop "steamer" that was designed for steaming rice and makes perfect rice (and great veggies too). The rice tastes great and it isn't sticky. I also have a little Black & Decker steamer that I had forgotten was also for cooking rice. Anyway, I have been playing around with both of these to figure out why my stovetop model makes so much better tasting rice. I think that it may be because it is aluminum and/or because it doesn't vent alot. The Black & Decker has steam holes all over it and the stovetop only allows some steam out between the lid and the pan and it really isn't supposed to do that (my lid is bent a little from 20 years of use/abuse). Maybe that is keeping the flavor in? The difference in taste is dramatic enough that I am going to continue my search for some sort of rice cooker that I feel confident will make rice that tastes that good. If/when I find something, I will let the list know. BTW, I use Texmati rices - not only because they grow great rice but because even though I live in Washington state, I am still a Texan. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Clelia (cmd@ICA.NET) Subject: POLENTA (CORNMEAL) 2 cups coarsely ground cornmeal 8 cups water 1 tbs.. salt (I omit the salt since the cheese is at time salty) 1 handful of Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese (this cheese give a better taste than the others) 1 Tbs.. butter/margarine In a large heavy saucepan bring water to a boil. Reduce heat to medium low and add salt. (Important not to add salt before the water boils). Very slowly add the cornmeal at this point I lower the heat temperature (I usually put it into a sieve so I can control the amount that goes in, this way you can prevent the lumps from forming) stir constantly with a long large wooden spoon. After all the cornmeal has been added cook for about 40-50 mins. As it is cooking the Polenta will thicken and it will bubble. Keep stirring and crush or discard any lumps that may form. When cooked add the butter and cheese. (At this point you can add almost anything you like, you may omit the cheese. My family likes to have tomato sauce or pesto sauce added at this point). Once Polenta starts coming off the sides of the pan then it is cooked. To serve soft place Polenta in a casserole dish, top with your favorite sauce e.g.: tomato, meat, cheese or pasta sauce. To serve with a firmer consistency place Polenta in a flat casserole dish and let it set for a few minutes (it will be easier to cut), cut into slices or squares. The slices can be grilled, fried or baked and topped with your choice of sauce and cheese. Wen I make my Polenta, I usually make enough to have half recipe soft and half a firmer consistency, this way you a multi choice of recipes you can have on hand e.g.: * grill a not too thin slice and you can use it as bread during a meal. * cut a thin slice and top it off with tomato sauce and cheese and you have a pizza slice. ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~Desserts~

From: (Pixilated@WORLDNET.ATT.NET) Subject: Summary/coffee cake toppers 2 suggested the following: We have always simply substituted brown rice flour for the wheat flour usually called for in coffee cake topping; we think it's delicious and none of the resident wheat eaters have ever complained. *one uses this as a sub for apple pie topping as well. **************** You could try using crushed Energ-E Crisp Rice cereal instead of the flour or use it with a small amt of GF mix. Any other GF rice cereal would probably work also. I make apple crisp (my husband's recipe ) and substitute the crushed rice cereal for the oatmeal and it tastes really great. ***************** I use the topping mix recipe in Bette hagman book for Rhubarb Crumble. ***************** I have had very good luck adapting a recipe from a book called _Make-a-Mix Cookery_, Karine Eliason et al, Fisher Publishing, Inc., USA, 1978, ISBN 0-89586-007-4. (It is copyrighted but almost certainly out of print.) The recipe is for Cookie Crumb Crust Mix: 6 C. all-purpose flour* 1 1/2 C chopped nuts 1 1/2 C brown sugar, firmly packed 1 lb butter or margarine, softened Preheat oven to 375 F (190 C). In a large bowl, combine flour, muts, and brown sugar. Blend well. With a pastry blender, cut in butter or margarine until mixture resembles cornmeal in texture. Press mixture firmly into 2 unbuttered, shallow baking pans. Bake about 15 minutes. Cool. Crumble and put in a large airtight container. Label. Store in a cool, dry place. Use within 4 to 6 weeks. Makes about 10 1/2 cups of COOKIE CRUMB CRUST MIX. *I have used a variety of flour mixtures and had very good luck. I'm sure the Bette Hagman mix would work out just fine. (I tend to be an adhoc flour mixer - a little white rice flour, a little brown rice flour, a little starch - potato or corn - some millet flour if I have it......) To use the above recipe for a crumb crust, press about 2 cups into a baking pan or 9-inch pie plate and bake according to directions for filling. ****************** I use Health Valley Rice Bran Crackers. These have been mentioned on the list before, they are a really good substitute for grahm crackers. AnywayI put them in my blender and they make really good crumbs. ****************** two people suggested the following: Suggestion #1 I suggest looking into rolled buckwheat. I've used it with success when oatmeal is called for. Not exactly what you asked but it might do. I don't know where you would get it in your neck of the woods, but I get it from Kinnikinnick Foods in Edmonton, Alberta. They sell only GF products. Suggestion #2 uses it more like one would use Oats to make the crunchy buckle topping for Apple Crisp. Just a thought. ****************** I make muffins that are hard to distinguish from gluten muffins. For the topping I take 1 stick butter, and cut it up with a pastry blender add about 1/2 cup brown sugar and 1/3 cup gf flour. For apple, cranberry, or sweet potato muffins, I add1/2 - 3/4 tsp. cinnamon. I sprinkle this on the muffins before baking (sometimes adding chopped pecans). It stays crumbly and I'm sure it would work for coffee cake too. MY NOTE: This is the idea I have been using but without success. The only difference I can see is that I have been using "margarine" instead of *real* butter. Guess I will try the real butter next time. ***************** I make a coffecake topping using: 3/4 cup flaked sweetened coconut 1/2 cup chopped nuts (I prefer pecans) 2 tbl brown sugar 1 tsp cinnamon Just mix and put over top of coffeecake or muffins before baking. ***************** I mix margarine and or applesauce with sugar, corn meal or corn flour (masa harina), apple fiber, and cinnamon to top most cobbler type fruit desserts. I mix up the dry ingredients then add only enough melted margarine or applesauce (or both) to make it crumbly. I also add sugar to taste, sweeter if I have tarter fruit. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lynn Samuel (samueJ@AOL.COM) Subject: Chocolate Roll Separate 6 LARGE EGGS. Into the YOLKS , beat 1 C SUGAR; then add 7 oz. DARK SWEET or BITTER SWEET CHOCOLATE , which has been melted with 6 T COFFEE or WATER, and cooled before adding to YOLKS. Then add stiffly beaten EGG WHITES. OIL a 16 X 11 cookie sheet; line with WAX PAPER, and OIL again (with a 2 overlap at edges). Spread the mixture evenly on cookie sheet. Bake 12 minutes in a 350 degree F. Oven and 5 minutes with oven door open. Cover with a damp cloth and cool in the refrigerator. Then carefully remove the damp cloth; sprinkle with UNSWEETENED COCOA. Turn onto wax paper; peel paper carefully. Whip 1 C WHIPPING CREAM. Add VANILLA and a little SUGAR. Spread and roll like a jelly roll. Leave overnight in refrigerator and cut off ends to look even. NOTE: I used Bitter sweet chocolate and coffee rather than water. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lynn Samuel (samueJ@AOL.COM) Subject: Chocolate Turtles Candy 25 g-f caramels 1 C pecans 2 tsp. Evaporated milk 4 double squares semi-sweet chocolate Melt the caramels with milk in microwave. Arrange pecan halves in groups of 3 on lightly greased baking sheet. Spoon melted caramels over nuts, leaving tips showing. Cool for 30 minutes (or put in refrigerator). Melt chocolate in the microwave. Stir until smooth. Pour over caramel using a spatula to help. They can be frozen. Can yield 36. (May use milk chocolate instead of semi-sweet if desired). ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Paul Kiesskalt (kiesskal@MELBPC.ORG.AU) Subject: Hazelnut Cookies Ingredients: 500 g *pure icing sugar 500 g ground hazelnuts 10 egg whites gluten-free flour (if required) Procedure: Beat the egg whites until very stiff. Fold in icing sugar Fold in ground hazelnuts Drop spoonfuls onto greased baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes in pre-heated oven at 220 degrees C (425 F). If dough is too thin, add a little gluten-free flour. *Icing sugar must be labelled "pure" - some icing sugars not labelled pure could contain gluten. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Ellen (asher@PACINFO.COM) Subject: Orange Chocolate chip cookies Wet Ingredients, beat well: 1 cup butter or margarine (or 1/2 cup + 1/2 cup applesauce for a lower fat cookie) 2 cup sugar (I prefer 1/3 to 1/2 cup Sucanate) 2 eggs (or 4 whites) 1 tsp. vanilla 1 orange, seeded, chopped fine, with rind (I use a mini electric chopper, cuisinart or blender) Dry Ingredients, mix with wire wisk, then add to wet ingredients and mix thoroughtly: 2 cup white rice flour (or 1 cup + 1 cup brown rice flour) 1/2 cup sweet rice flour 1/2 to 1 tsp salt 1 tsp baking soda Add and mix: 1 cup chopped nuts or raisins (or both) 1 cup chocolate chips (my favorite are by Tropical Source and I use 1/2 package semi-sweet + 1/2 package expresso chocolate chips for an extra zip) Drop by teaspoon on a non-stick cookie sheet. (They don't spread out if applesauce is used.) Bake at 350 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lisas156 (Lisas156@AOL.COM) Subject: Hamentashen 4 Eggs 1 Cup Vegetable oil 1/4 tsp. Salt 4 1/2 Cups GF flour 1 tsp. GF Vanilla 1 1/2 Cups Sugar 2 tsp. Xanthan Gum 4 tsp. Baking powder Suggested fillings: Cherry, apricot or other pie type fillings or fruit filled jam. Most stores carry various brands. Check ingredients carefully, since many of these fillings contain starch. Most use tapioca, which is fine. If un-stated, be sure to call the company. Can also cook dried fruits such as apricot with a little honey and a little water to a thick, jam-like consistency. For PASTRY: Cream sugar and oil, then add eggs and blend well. Stir in vanilla. Mix together dry ingredients and add to wet. Roll out on GF floured surface. Cut into 2 1/2 circles. Add 1 tsp. filling and moisten edges of dough with water. Bring together sides of circle to form a triangle, with the filling "peeking" through the middle. Pinch edges of dough to hold shape. Bake on a lightly greased sheet at 350° for 10-15 minutes. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Jan Hill (janhill@WORLDNET.ATT.NET) 4 eggs 1 c oil 1/4 tsp salt juice and rind of 1/2 orange 1 tsp vanilla 1 1/2 c sugar 2 tsp xanthan gum 4 1/2 c GF flour 4 tsp GF baking powder Cream sugar and oil. Add eggs. Blend well. Blend in juice, grated rind and vanilla. Add dry ingredients, mixing well. Separate dough into 4 parts. Roll to desired thickness. Use GF flour as necessary to prevent dough from sticking to board. Cut into 2 1/2 inch circles. GF flour mixture: 1 c brown rice flour 1 c white rice flour 1 c sweet rice flour 1 c tapioca flour 1/2 c potato starch Filling: Use Solo brand or any GF filling. Put 1 tsp filling in center of circle. Pinch edges of dough together forming triangles. Bake at 350 for 15 minutes. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Chris Silker (silk@MEANS.NET) Subject: Chocolate Chip Cookies Ok - I think that I've perfected my chocolate chip cookie recipe and thought that I would share it with everyone. My gluten-consuming friends agree that these are delicious, and consume the cookies as fast as I can make them. My friend's 5-year old daughter eats both dough and cookies with great pleasure and has never said anything about how the cookies taste weird at my house - another good sign! 3/4 cup butter/margarine (I use I Can't Believe It's Not Butter or lightly salted butter) 3/4 c brown sugar 3/4 c white sugar 2 tsp gf vanilla (or so - I just kinda dump it in there...) - the powder doesn't work so well 2 eggs (I use pasteurized eggs, so we can eat the dough) 1 c sweet rice flour (my rice and tapioca flours are from an Oriental market) 1 c rice flour 1/4 c tapioca flour 1 tsp baking soda 1 tsp xanthan gum (can decrease this a bit if the dough seems too stiff) 1 c chocolate chips Cream butter and sugars. Add vanilla and eggs and mix well. Add dry ingredients and mix well. Add chocolate chips. Bake for about 10 min at 350F, or until the edges are just starting to turn golden brown. Do NOT overbake. Let sit for a few minutes on the cookie sheet so they can set. These cookies don't warm up well in the microwave - they get a bit crumbly. Also, I tend to bake a pan at a time and keep the rest of the dough in the fridge, as these cookies dry out faster than the traditional kind. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Jane Winkenwerder (CWink123@AOL.COM) Subject: Peanutbutter cookies I just wanted to thank the person who posted their p-nut butter cookie recipe recently ( I accidently deleted that digest). I couldn't believe how easy it was to make and how good the cookies turned out. My whole family loved them. 1 C. p-nut butter 1 C. Sugar 1 egg, beaten 350' 7 - 10 min. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "Judy C. Hettena Wright" (hettenawright@COMPUSERVE.COM) Subject: Ladyfingers 3 eggs, separated 6 Tbsp granulated sugar 3/4 cup sifted GF flour mix 6 Tbsp confectioner's sugar Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Brush 2 baking sheets with softened butter and line with parchment paper. Beat the egg whites with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Gradually beat in the granulated sugar and continue beating until still peaks form again; the meringue will be glossy and smooth. Lightly beat the egg yolks with a fork and fold into the meringue with a wooden spoon. Sift the flour mix over the mixture and fold in gently. Pipe the ladyfinger batter (using a pastry bag with a large plain tip) in strips 5 inches long and 3/4 inch wide diagonally onto the baking sheets,leaving 1 to 2 inches between each strip. Sprinkle half of the confectioner's sugar over the ladyfingers; wait 5 minutes and sprinkle with the remaining sugar. Holding the parchment paper in place with your thumb, lift one side of the baking sheet and gently tap it on the work surface to remove excess sugar. Bake without opening the oven door for 10 minutes. Then rotate the baking sheet and cook until lightly golden, about 5 more minutes. Remove the ladyfingers from the baking sheet with a metal spatula while still hot and cool on a rack. Store in an airtight container. I used Bette Hagman's GF mix, but any "light" GF flour should work.. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Tom Laichas (tlaichas@LAEDU.LALC.K12.CA.US) Subject: Hamenstashen Responses This post includes two sections: "general advice" and "recipes". There are seven pieces of advice and four recipes. Any recipe sent to me which did not use GF ingredients does not appear here. Thanks to all who sent hamentashen recipes and advice. Some who sent us recipes may not want their addresses published here. To err on the side of their privacy I am posting these recipes without attribution, unless the original source was already published. Anyone who wishes to take credit can do so. Note that in searching the archives for these and later posts, keep in mind that spelling varies. We've seen "hamenstaschen", "hamenstashen", "hamentaschen" and "hamenstashen". For those of you who aren't Jewish, hamenstashen are three-cornered cookies with a sweet filling served on the Purim holiday. GENERAL ADVICE 1. Use your old recipe and substitute a GF flour. Some suggested GF flours: a. 1 1/2c rice flour and 1/2c sweet rice flour for every 2c of wheat flour, then use rice flour to get the right consistency, if needed. b. Soy flour c. Bette Hagen "Gluten Free Gourmet Cooks Fast and Healthy" cookbook's combination flour: 1 part bean flour, 1 part corn starch, 1 part tapioca flour, 1/2 part rice flour. d. GF Flour Mix (used in Recipe #3) 1 c. brown rice flour 2/3 c. tapioca flour 2 tsp. xanthan gum 1 c. white rice flour 1/3 c. corn starch 3/4 c. sweet rice flour 1/4 c. potato starch e. 1 C each of brown rice, white rice sweet rice flour plus 1/2 C potato starch. (used in Recipe #5) 2. There is a site exclusively for hamenstashen recipes. THESE RECIPES ARE NOT GLUTEN-FREE, but experimentation with GF flours may transform one of these forbidden recipes into a GF classic. The site may be found at: http://www.eskimo.com/~jefffree/recipes/hamindex.htm 3. One respondent suggests using a GF sugar cookie recipe and shape them like triangles and put GF preserves in the middle, or maybe a pie crust recipe. Note that it's important to have a dough which will hold its shape when folded into the triangle. 4. For fillings, consult a Jewish cookbook---many filling recipes are already GF or easily made so. Fruit preserves work as a filling and save any cooking at all. 5. "Cake" recipes adapt to GF flours more readily than "Raised" recipes, says one respondent. 6. When using a GF flour for hamentaschen recipes, make sure to add 1 tsp xanthum gum per cup of flour. Otherwise the dough will lack the necessary "play", one respondent says. 7. "find the *best* baker at your shul, plead ignorance, invoke "pikuach nefesh" and ask for help. The reason that you want help is that you may have to "play" with the flour/liquid proportions - if the dough "looks" right, it'll bake up just fine - but you need someone who knows how the dough is supposed to look." ----------------------------------------- RECIPE #1 After rolling GF dough to about 1/4" thickness (or a little thicker; don't make it too thin or it will break over the filling), cut out 3" circles. Put a teaspoonful of filling in the center of the circle, then fold up three sides leaving some exposed filling. Pinch the corners with water-moistened fingers to seal them shut. Bake in 350 degree oven until golden brown. ----------------------------------------- RECIPE #2 Preheat oven to 350. Bowl: 2 1/4 cups tapioca flour 1 tsp. salt 1/3 cup sugar 1/2 tsp. guar/xanthan gum (omit for piecrust) Blender or Food Processor: 1 cup Filberts/Macadamias 1/4 cup water 1/2 cup canola oil 1 tsp. vanilla Grind the nuts very fine. Add contents of food processor to bowl and mix. Roll into balls and flatten. Bake on greased cookie sheet at 350 for 10 - 15 (?) minutes or until they begin to turn golden-brown. I like them a bit golden - they're crispier. I highly recommend investing in an Airbake cookie sheet so as not to burn your GF cookies. Makes 2 1/2 dozen cookies. This dough rolls out on a potato-starch-floured board quite successfully to make cookie-cutter cookies (dinos are a big hit around here.) It also makes an excellent pie crust - flaky and delicious. Cover the edges with foil and pre- bake for 15 minutes before filling. I always use macadamias - very inexpensive at my warehouse store. I admit, when I'm in a hurry I just start with the nuts in the food processor, then add the other wet then dry ingredients one at a time until I have my cookie dough. It works ok for me, but you may prefer not to cheat, depending on your food processor. Rolling it out, then flouring and folding several times, then rolling quite thick and cutting with fluted circles would probably result in something like an English scone, texture-wise. A few raisins, some clotted cream & jam... ----------------------------------------- RECIPE #3: GF Flour Mix: 1 c. brown rice flour 2/3 c. tapioca flour 2 tsp. xanthan gum 1 c. white rice flour 1/3 c. corn starch 3/4 c. sweet rice flour 1/4 c. potato starch Make a mix of this and use 2 cups of it (save the rest for something else - waffles, cones, cookies) in the recipe: ----------------------------------------- Honey Dough: 2 c. sifted GF flour 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. baking powder 1/4 shortening, softened 2 eggs 1/2 c. honey Sift flour, salt and baking powder in a bowl. Make a well in the center and place shortening, eggs and honey in it. Work together until a dough is formed. Roll out on a GF floured surface and cut into 4" circles. Place a heaping tablespoon of filling on each and fold into a triangle shape, sealing the edges with wettened fingers. Bake at 350 deg. for 20 min or until browned. Makes about 1 1/2 dozen. Fillings: *Poppy Seed*: 1 c. poppy seeds 1/2 c. milk 1/3 c. honey 1/2 tsp. grated lemon rind Grind poppy seeds or put through food chopper. Combine with milk and honey. Cook all over low heat, stirring frequently until thick. Stir in the lemon rind and cool the mixture. Cool and fill the dough. ----------------------------------------- *Nut & Honey*: 1 lb. (1/2kg) ground walnuts 1/2kg (1lb) honey 1/4 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 c. sugar drop of lemon juice Combine all ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Boil for 2-3 minutes, stirring constantly. Let cool. ----------------------------------------- RECIPE #4 (posted to list last year by Ellen Switkes and recommended by several respondents) 4 eggs 1 C oil 1/4 t salt 4 1/2 c flour mixture* or more if needed 1 t vanilla 1 1/2 C sugar 2 t xantham gum (this is in the recipe, but I always omit it) 4 t baking powder *flour mixture is 1 C each of brown rice, white rice sweet rice flour plus 1/2 C potato starch. Mix all ingredients. Add extra flour if needed. Dough is oily. Roll walnut sized circles, place on greased sheet. Flatten, put jelly or other filling in center, fold up to a 3 sided triangle, pinch corners and bake 350 degrees for 10 to 15 min. Don't wait until Purim. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "Melissa C." (skywalk2@NETTAXI.COM) Subject: Birthday Cake summary ----------------------------------------- Puddle Cake 1.5 cups white rice flour 3 tablespoons cocoa 1/2 tsp salt 1/8 cup sugar 1 tsp baking soda Mix & pour into greased, floured pan and make hole in middle. Pour into hole: 6 tbsp salad oil or 1 cup apple sauce 1 tbsp apple cidar vinegar 1 cup water Mix....Bake 350 Check for doneness in 15-20 minutes. (Credit Susan Foss) [Notes: I tried this tonite, and used the apple sauce. I put it in a 9x13 pan, it should have been in a square, as it was only about 3/4 inch thick when done. It had a cracked (like the Mojave) top, and no flavor. Maybe it needs more cocoa and sugar. The texture was moist, except for the top. I may experiment with this one at a later date.] This recipe looks pretty strange, but the cake is wonderful, one of the best chocolate cakes (gf or not) we've ever had, and it (the cake) doesn't look strange at all -- ----------------------------------------- MOIST COCOA-LENTIL CAKE Lentil puree: 2/3 c. dry lentils, rinsed and drained 2 c. boiling water Bring to boil in saucepan, cover and simmer 40 min. Drain, reserving liquid. Combine lentils and 1/4 c. reserved liquid in blender or food processor. Puree. Cake batter: 1-1/2 c. sugar 1 c. oil 4 large eggs 1 tsp. vanilla 1-3/4 c. lentil puree 2 c. brown rice flour** 4 tblsp. cocoa 1-1/2 tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp. salt Combine sugar, oil and eggs in mixer bowl and beat well. Add vanilla and lentil puree, blending thoroughly. Add dry ingredients and mix well. Pour batter into greased and rice floured (or nonstick sprayed) 9" X 12" pan. Bake at 350 degrees for 30-35 minutes or until center springs back when lightly touched or cake tester comes out clean. Cool and frost. **Recipe originally appeared in the April-June 1987 Gluten Intolerance Group of North America Newsletter and used white rice flour. I've always baked exclusively with brown rice flour on the theory that it's way more nutritious and celiac people...are already nutritionally at risk. (Credit Mariha Kuechmann) ----------------------------------------- CHOCOLATE CAKE RECIPE 1-3/4 c. GF flour 1/2 t. zanthum gum 2 c. sugar 3/4 c. cocoa 1-1/2 t. baking soda 1-1/2 t. baking powder 1 t. salt 2 eggs 1 c. milk (optional: add 1 t. vinegar to sour) 1/2 c. oil 2 t. vanilla 1 c. boiling water (optional: use black coffee instead for stronger flavor) Combine dry ingredients in large bowl & mix. Beat eggs well, add milk and oil. Mix together both dry & wet ingredients. Batter will be thin. Pour into greased & floured 13x9" pan. Bake at 350 deg. for 35-40 min. (credit Wendy) Cake(milk free, egg free, wheat free & chocolate free) 3 c. soy flour 1 1/2 to 2 c. granulated sugar 1 tsp. salt 2 tsp. baking soda 3 to 6 Tbsp. carob powder 2 tsp. vanilla 3/4 c. vegetable oil 2 Tbsp. lemon juice Combine all ingredients in mixing bowl. Gradually blend 2 cups of water with this mixture until all lumps are gone. There will be enought bater to fill a greased 9x13 pan. If the batter is baked in cupcake tins instead, cupcakes can be individually frozen and thawed with greater ease. Bake pan cake for 1 hour at 350 degrees; cupcakes approximately 25 minutes. (credit cook books online - www. cookbooksonline.com) ----------------------------------------- Whipped Cream Cake Preheat overn to 350°. Grease an 8x12 inch pan. Sift dry ingredients: 1 1/2 c. oriental rice flour 2 tsp. gluten-free baking powder 1/4 tsp. salt Whip until stiff: 1 c. cold whipping cream Add: 2 eggs 1 c. sugar 1 tsp. g.f. vanilla Continue beating until no longer gritty. Add dry ingredients, Blend w/ wire whisk. Pour into prepared pan. Tap on counter to remove air bubbles. Bake 30-45 min, or until it tests done. Top w/ cinnamon sugar while still warm or cool well & frost. I worried about the whipped cream at first but it has the same calories as if one uses 1/2 c. butter & 1/2 c. whole milk, but is SO much easier. You can make a double recipe in a deep (2") 9X13 pan. I don't do the sifting & I mix dry ingredients in w/ the mixer. It freezes well & is actually better the 2nd day--if it lasts that long. I've made multiple recipes (8) and make sheet cakes for special occassions for my celiacs sons. The secret ingredient is the fine white rice flour from the oriental grocery. (credit The Joy of Gluten-Free Cooking by Jaunita Kisslinger) ----------------------------------------- CHOCOLATE FUDGE CAKE 4 oz. unsweetened chocolate 2 1/4 cups sifted GF flour mix 2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 cup butter 2 1/4 cups brown sugar 3 lg. eggs 1 1/2 tsp. GF vanilla 1 cup gf sour cream 1 cup boiling water 1 1/2 tsp. xanthan gum ( or guar gum) 1. grease and flour cake pans 2. melt chocolate in small bowl over hot water, set aside to cool 3. sift flour, xanthan gum, baking soda, and salt into lg. bowl 4. cream butter in another lg. bowl, add brown sugar and eggs. Beat at high speed until light and fluffy for 5 mins. 5. beat in vanilla and chocolate 6. stir in dry ingredients alternately with sour cream. Beat well with wooden spoon after each addition, until batter is smooth 7. stir in boiling water, batter will be thin 8. pour at once into prepared pans bake 335 (or 350) for about 35 mins 9. remove from pans, cool, frost with chocolate fudge frosting yield: 9" 2 layer cake Notes: if frozen it reheats well in microwave, does not stay fresh at room temp. for long, gets crumbly. ----------------------------------------- YELLOW BUTTERMILK CAKE 1. SEPARATE 5 EGGS 2. IN MED. BOWL, BEAT 5 egg whites w/ 1 tsp. cream of tarter to stiff peaks 3. in lg. bowl cream: 5 egg yolks, 2 cups sugar, 1 tsp. vanilla, 1/4 cup applesauce 4. sift 2 3/4 cup gf mix with: 1/4 cup soy flour ( if not tolerated, use 1/4 cup gf mix) 1 1/2 tsp. baking soda, 1/4 tsp. salt 5. Add all ingredients alternately with 1 1/2 cups buttermilk. Bake 350 for 40-50 mins. or until done. Can use 2, 9 " pans or 9x14 pan. Can try to make chocolate by adding baking chocolate or cocoa. Notes: moister if made from sweet rice flour as part of gf mix ROYAL PECAN CHOCOLATE GATEAU 1/2 cup melted butter 1 1/4 cup sugar 4 T. cocoa 4 eggs 1/2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. vanilla 2 cups pecans 1. Pour all ingredienets into food processor. Process for 30 seconds, scrape down sides. Process again for 30 seconds, Pour into buttered spring form pan, bake 350 for 35 mins. 2. Melt together: 1/4 cup milk, 1/2 cup chocolate chips 3. Whisk and pour over cake Notes: if using 10" spring form pan, make the recipe 1 1/2 times or cake will be too thin. ----------------------------------------- BLACK MAGIC CAKE 1 3/4 cup rice flour 3/4 cup cocoa 1 tsp baking powder 1 cup brewed black coffee 1/2 cup oil 1 tsp vanilla 2 cups sugar 2 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. salt 2 eggs 1 cup sour milk - add liquid ingredients to dry and beat at med. speed for 3 minutes - bake in 9 x 13 pan for 45 to 50 mins, or in 2 layer pans for 25 to 30 mins. Notes: sour milk can be made by adding 1 tsp. vinegar to 1 c. milk and letting set for 5 mins. Sift dry ingredients, black coffee can be replaced with water ----------------------------------------- BANANA DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE 2 CUPS BROWN SUGAR 1/2 C. margerine or butter 2 lg. eggs 1/2 cup mashed banana 1 cup buttermilk 1/2 tsp xanthan gum 2 cups gf mix 3 tbs. soya flour 1 1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 c. cocoa 1 tsp. salt Cream shortening and brown sugar, add eggs and beat well. Add banana and buttermilk, mix well. In separate bowl, mix dry ingredients, mix well. Slowly add to the wet ingredients and beat till smooth. Pour into greased pan, bake at 350 till toothpick comes out clean. 9x13, approximately 30 mins. ----------------------------------------- CHOCOLATE SOUFFLE ROLL note: to make this a layer cake, rather than a roll cake, bake the batter in three, 7" or 8" round pans, lined with parchment paper. The layer (flavored with Grand Marnier or vanilla) and berries between the layers, finished on the top with whipped cream rosettes with a dipped berry on each rosette. 7 oz. dark, sweet chocolate (such as Lindt) 4 tbsp. very strong prepared coffee 7 eggs, separated 3/4 cup sugar, divided 2 tbsp. cocoa Preheat oven to 350, grease 10" x 15" jelly roll pan and line w/ greased wax paper. Melt chocolate and coffee in double boiler and stir until chocolate is melted. Cool slightly. Beat yolks with 1/2 c. sugar until fluffy and pale yellow. Add chocolate and coffee to yolks. Beat whites until soft peaks form. Add 1/4 c. sugar, beating gradually until stiff peaks form. Fold whites into chocolate mixture. Pour batter into pan and bake 15 - 20 mins. or until roll is firm. Remove and cool for 5 mins. Place damp towel over roll and cool completely at room temp. Store in cool place. Remove towel from roll and sprinkle with cocoa. Place an ungreased sheet of wax paper over roll and turn roll upside down. Remove pan and 1st piece of wax paper. Spread whipped cream or mocha filling over flattened cake and roll up very carefully and quickly. Store in refrigerator. Serves 8 - 10 ----------------------------------------- APPLESAUCE CAKE (no eggs,dairy,wheat,corn) 1/2 cup oil 1/2 cup sugar 1 1/2 Tbsp water 2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp vanilla 1 cup rice flour 3/4 cup buckwheat flour (or other flour) 1/2 cup soy flour 2 tsp arrowroot flour (tapioca or potato starch) 1 tsp soda 1/2 tsp salt 1 tsp cinnamon (cardomen) 1/2 tsp nutmeg (opt) 1 cup applesauce 1 cup of raisons (opt) Mix dry ingredients and add to wet ingredients. Do not overmix. Cook at 325 degrees in an 9x13x2 greased pan for 35 minutes. 18 cupcakes would take 20-25 minutes to cook. Cut when cake is cool. This is a scratch recipe that is EASY!!! I'm not even a baker. I had to become one if I wanted anything good to eat. ----------------------------------------- White Cake Recipe 2 cups GF flour(Bette Hagman's) 2 tsp. xanthan gum 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 tsp salt 3 1/2 tsp baking powder 1/2 cup shortening 1 cup milk (lactose free if necessary) 1tsp vanilla 3 eggs Heat oven to 350. Grease and flour baking pan, 13 X 9 X 2" or 2 round layer pans or for cupcakes (muffin tins) - use paper liners. Measure all ingredients into a large bowl. Blend 1/2 minute on low speed, scraping bowl constantly. Beat 3 minutes on high speed, scraping bowl occasionally. Pour into pans. Bake 40-45 minutes for oblong, 30-35 for round, and 15-20 for cupcakes or until wooden pick inserted in centre comes out clean. Cool. I tend to make cupcakes as they freeze well. I just take them out and pop them into the microwave and they are GREAT! (credit Lynn Facey) --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Deborah Fletcher (DHDeb@AOL.COM) Subject: Summary for German chocolate cake I also received recommendations to use regular chocolate cake recipe, but substitute German chocolate for the chocolate baking squares. Furthermore, you can make a regular GF chocolate cake and just use the special coconut-pecan frosting (pillsbury). Authentic Foods 800-806-4737 makes a good chocolate cake mix that is GF. Chocolate Cake 1 Cup Sugar *1 Cup Gluten Free Flour (see below) 4 Tablespoons Cocoa 1Teaspoon Soda 1 Teaspoon Xanthan Gum (optional) 1 Cup Sour Cream 2 Eggs 1 Teaspoon Vanilla Sift Sugar, Flour and Cocoa and Xathan Gum together. Mix together Sour Cream and Soda, add Eggs and Vanilla. Blend with Flour mixture and beat until blended. Pour into prepared pans and Bake at 300 degrees until done. Icing 1 Cup Evaporated Milk 1 Cup Sugar 3 Egg Yolks 1/4 LB Butter 1 Teaspoon Vanilla 1 1/3 Cups Coconut 1 Cup chopped Pecans. Combine Milk, Sugar, Egg Yolks, Butter and Vanilla in a saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture thickens. remove from heat, and add Coconut and Pecans. Beat until cool and of spreading consistency. *Gluten Free Flour 3 Cups Brown Rice Flour 1 Cup Corn Flour 1/2 Cup Tapioca Flour Mix together and store into an airtight container. Use in recipes in place of flour. I use this all my cake and muffin recipes. Before each use shake the container because the flour tends to settle. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Silva Hornborg (silva.hornborg@MAIL.BIP.NET) Subject: Great hazelnut cockies: 200 g ground hazelnuts 200 g sugar 2 eggs Procedure: Mix it all together and drop spoonfuls onto greased baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes(or so) in pre-heated oven at 220 degrees C (425 F). Or make 2 'loaves' that you cut in smaller pieces after baking. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "C.M. D'Orazio" (cmd@ICA.NET) Subject: Apple struesel Pie During our last Monday's Chat Group a lot of people requested this recipe, I thought of sharing it with you all. For those of us leaving in Canada, you can find the Club House Product (which are GF) in most major stores. Please keep in mind that I have made this recipe ONLY with the Club House Product. I have NOT made it with any other kind of GF flour. APPLE STREUSEL PIE Filling: 1/3 c. raisins 1/3 c. granulated sugar 1 tsp. Club House Minute Tapioca or ( any GF Tapioca) 1/2 tsp. Club House Ground Cinnamon or GF Ground Cinnamon 1/2 tsp. Club House Ground Nutmeg or GF Ground Nutmeg 6 medium apples, peeled and sliced 1 tbsp. lemon juice Streusel: 1/3 c. Club House Rice Flour or GF Rice Flour (extra fine) 1/4 c. firmly-packed brown sugar 1/2 tsp. Club House Ground Cinnamon 1/4 c. margarine 1/4 c. slivered almonds (optional) Prepare pastry for filled pie shell. Bake at 375F (190C) for five minutes. Combine raisins, granulated sugar, Tapioca, Cinnamon and Nutmeg. Stir in apples and lemon juice. Place into a pie shell. For streusel, combine Rice Flour, brown sugar and Cinnamon. Cut in butter until mixture is crumbly. Stir in almonds, if desired. Spoon onto apples. Bake at 375F (190C) for 35 to 40 minutes or until apples are tender. Serve warm or cooled. Makes about 8 servings. ~~~~~~~~~~~ RICE FLOUR PASTRY Rice four Pastry is very delicate and may break in handling. However, it does repair readily and there is no worry of toughening the pastry from over handling. Some cracks may appear in baked product. 1 c. Club House Rice Flour or GF rice flour 1 tbsp. granulated sugar 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp baking powder 1/3 c. shortening 3 tbsp cold water 1/2 tsp. Club House Vanilla Extract or GF Vanilla Extract Combine Rice Flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. Cut in shortening until mixture is crumbly. Combine water and Vanilla. Stir into flour mixture just until moistened. With floured hands, press into 9-inch pie plate. OR, form dough into ball and roll between two sheets of waxed paper to about 1/8 inch thickness. Remove to paper. Turn into pie plate. Remove remaining paper. Carefully fit into pie plate. Flute edges. When making pie shell for filled pie bake crust at 375F (190) for five minutes. Then fill and bake pie according to recipe. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "C.M. D'Orazio" (cmd@ICA.NET) Subject: APPLE BUTTERSCOTCH TAPIOCA 1/2 c. firmly-packed brown sugar 1/3 c. Club House Minute Tapioca 1/4 tsp Club House Ground Cinnamon 1/4 tsp. salt 3 medium apples, peeled and sliced 2 tbsp. margarine 1 tsp. lemon juice 2-1/4 c. warm water In saucepan, combine brown sugar, Tapioca, Cinnamon and salt. Add apples, margarine, lemon juice and water. Bring to a boil; simmer for 8-10 minutes over low heat, stirring frequently, until apples are tender and pudding is thickened. Serve warm or cover and chill. MICROWAVE DIRECTIONS: Combine ingredients in 1 quarts (2L) microwave-safe bowl. Cover. Cook on HIGH power for 10 - 12 minutes, stirring occasionally. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Chris Silker (silk@MEANS.NET) Subject: Double Fudge Saucepan Brownies 2T butter 2T water 1/2 cup sugar Mix the above in a saucepan over low heat, stirring constantly until the mixture starts to boil. Remove from heat. Add 6 oz (1 cup) gf semisweet chocolate chips and stir until the chips are melted. Add 1 tsp gf vanilla (I've never tried the powder) 2 slightly beaten eggs and mix well. Add 2/3 c gf flour mix (I use 2 parts sweet rice flour, 2 parts rice flour, and 1 part tapioca flour [all from an Oriental grocery]) 1/4 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp xanthan gum and mix well. Stir in 6 oz (1 cup) gf chocolate chips, mix well, and pour into a greased 9" square pan. Bake for 20-25 minutes at 350F. Do not overbake! If you wait until a toothpick comes out clean or the edges pull away from the side, they'll be too done. I usually take them out at about 20-22 minutes. These brownies are VERY rich. You can substitute double chocolate chips for the semisweet if you want your brownies to be even more decadent. These are always a hit at parties. The brownies will be crumbly when warm, but they're quite cohesive when they cool. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: CHEEKYR (CHEEKYR@AOL.COM) Subject: Dark Velvet Torte I found this recipe in a magazine and just changed the flour to GF baking mix and made the best chocolate desert ever! No different taste and everyone loved it! The best part is that it really is quick and easy. Enjoy! Dark Velvet Torte Prep and cook time: about 35 min. (really!) 8 oz. bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped (about 11/3 C.) (I used Nestles semi sweet chocolate morsels). 1/2 C (1/4 lb.) butter (not margarine), cut into 1/2 in. chunks 4 large eggs, separated 2 tsp. all-purpose flour (I use Welplan Potato and Cornstarch Baking Mix) 1/4 tsp. cream of tartar 1 Tbl. sugar whipped cream (I use Cool Whip) fresh raspberries, rinsed and drained 1. Microwave chocolate and butter together at 50 % power until chocolate is soft about 3-4 min). Stir until blended. 2. Add eggs and GF baking mix (flour) to chocolate mixture; whisk until smooth. 3. Combine egg whites and cream of tartar. Beat with a mixer on high speed until whites are foamy. Gradually add sugar and continue beating until whites hold stiff, glossy peaks. 4. Add about a fourth of the egg whites to chocolate mix; stir to mix well. Add remaining whites and gently fold into chocolate mix until evenly blended. Pour into an 8-inch cake pan with removable rim (I just used a regular round cake pan, greased and lightly floured (rice flour). Spread batter smooth. 5. Bake in a 350 degree oven until torte puffs slightly and center barely jiggles when pan is gently shaken, 18-20 min. Cool at least 1 hour in pan on rack (torte sinks slightly). 6. Serve with whipped cream and raspberries. Makes 8-10 servings --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "T. Porawa" (ce090@FREENET.CARLETON.CA) Subject: Chocolate Cake 1 Cup Sugar 1 Cup Gluten Free Flour (see below)** 4 Tablespoons Cocoa 1Teaspoon Soda 1 Teaspoon Xanthan Gum (optional)* 1 Cup Sour Cream*** 2 Eggs 1 Teaspoon Vanilla Sift Sugar, Flour and Cocoa and Xathan Gum together. Mix together Sour Cream and Soda, add Eggs and Vanilla. Blend with Flour mixture and beat until blended. Pour into prepared pans and Bake at 300 degrees until done. Use Duncan Hines Milk Chocolate frosting, which is GF. * You can substitue Guar Gum instead...it costs much less ** I use Arrowhead Mills GF baking mix..costs about $4.75 for a 28oz box and can be found in health food stores *** I substitute plain yogurt (fat free) instead --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Sherri T Miller (forbear@JUNO.COM) Subject: Cookies with an Easter message 1 c. whole pecans 1 tsp. vinegar 3 egg whites pinch salt 1 c. sugar zipper baggie wooden spoon tape Bible Preheat oven to 300 F. Place pecans in zipper baggie and let children beat them with the wooden spoon to break into small pieces. Explain that after Jesus was arrested he was beaten by the Roman soldiers. Read John 19:1-3. Let each child smell the vinegar. Put 1 tsp. vinegar into mixing bowl. Explain that when Jesus was thirsty on the cross he was given vinegar to drink. Read John 19:28-30. Add egg whites to vinegar. Eggs represent life. Explain that Jesus gave His life to give us life. Read John 10:10-11. Sprinkle a little salt into each child's hand. Let them taste it and brush the rest into the bowl. Explain that this represents the salty tears shed by Jesus' followers, and the bitterness of our own sin. Read Luke23:27. So far the ingredients are not very appetizing. Add 1 c. sugar. Explain that the sweetest part of the story is that Jesus died because He loves us. He wants us to know and belong to Him. Read Ps. 34:8 and John 3:16. Beat with a mixer on high speed for 12 to 15 minutes until stiff peaks are formed. Explain that the color white represents the purity in God's eyes of those whose sins have been cleansed by Jesus. Read Isa.1:18 and John 3:1-3. Fold in broken nuts. Drop by teaspoons onto wax paper covered cookie sheet. Explain that each mound represents the rocky tomb where Jesus' body was laid. Read Matt. 27:57-60. Put the cookie sheet in the oven, close the door and turn the oven OFF. Give each child a piece of tape and seal the oven door. Explain that Jesus' tomb was sealed. Read Matt. 27:65-66. GO TO BED! Explain that they may feel sad to leave the cookies in the oven overnight. Jesus' followers were in despair when the tomb was sealed. Read John 16:20 and 22. On Resurrection morning, open the oven and give everyone a cookie. Notice the cracked surface and take a bite. The cookies are hollow! On the first Resurrection day Jesus' followers were amazed to find the tomb open and empty. Read Matt. 28:1-9. HE HAS RISEN! --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Clelia (cmd@ICA.NET) Subject: Blueberry tofu "Yogurt/Ice Cream" 2-10 oz pkgs. Mori-Nu firm tofu 1/2 c. water 2/3 c. sweetener-maple syrup, brown rice syrup, etc. 2 c. frozen blueberries 1 tsp. blueberry extract 1 tsp. raspberry extract Combine all ingredients in blender, process until smooth. I sometimes will keep some of the blueberries whole, and stir them through when I am done blending, but before serving. You can vary this with just about any fresh or frozen fruit and extracts to match. This may also be frozen in an ice cream machine for ice cream, or freeze in ice cube trays. Champion juicer. Serves: 4 Preparation time: 15 minutes --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Clelia (cmd@ICA.NET) Subject: TOFU BANANA COCONUT ICE CREAM 2 oz. tofu, drained (about 330 grams) 3 very ripe bananas 1 c grated unsweetened coconut 1/2 c soy milk 2 tsp. vanilla extract 1 Tbs. dark rum (optional) 4 Tbs. oil (optional) Honey to taste (or other sweetener) Blend all ingredients until smooth. Freeze until half is hard. Scrape out into a food processor and blend again until smooth. (You could also use a blender for very small quantities). Freeze until firm. You could omit the coconut and add cocoa for chocolate-banana ice cream, or omit the coconut and add strawberries or peeled peaches for a strawberry-banana or peach-banana ice cream). --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Clelia (cmd@ICA.NET) Subject: PUMPKIN TOFU ICE CREAM 14 oz. tofu, drained (about 400 grams) 1 c. mashed cooked pumpkin or other dark yellow squash 1/2 c. fresh orange juice 4 Tbs. oil 4 Tbs. honey 2 Tbs. orange liqueur grated skin of 3/4 orange 1/2 tsp. grated skin of lemon 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/4 tsp. nutmeg Same instructions as the other ice cream. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Clelia (cmd@ICA.NET) Subject: Tofu Pudding Switch to tofu and cocoa powder or the Mori-Nu mates brand? All you do is put the firm tofu in a blender with a tablespoon of water and blend well, add honey (or sugar) and the flavoring (cocoa powder with more water, vanilla extract, etc.). It is far easier than getting soy milk to work - and very high in calcium too. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Clelia (cmd@ICA.NET) Subject: PUMPKIN CUSTARD Blend in a food processor or blender until smooth and creamy: 3/4 lb. tofu 1 can pumpkin (16 oz. which is approx. 2 cups) 1 c. light brown sugar 2 Tbs. oil 2 Tbs. molasses 1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1 tsp. salt 3/4 tsp. ginger 1/2 tsp. nutmeg Pour this mixture into a baking dish and bake at 350F (for 1 hour). I bake it until little bubble pot-holes appear in the center - they appear in the perimeter pretty quickly. Usually it's a bit longer baking time for my dishes, although, the bigger the dish and shallower the mix, the lower the baking time, probably). Serve hot or cold. (It never lasts long enough to chill at my house.) ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~Drinks~

From: "Curtis,Dave [St. John's]" (Dave.Curtis@EC.GC.CA) Subject: BEER The following is a summary of the results of my search for GF beer recipes Three notes: 1. There is inconsistent reporting from a wide variety of sources as to the availability of commercial GF beers. Some say yes and even list brands but others state the exact opposite. When it comes to my ingestion of foods that are supposedly GF, I follow the X-Files rule: "Trust No One" (except yourself maybe). 2. Secondly, a number of the recipes I received do not use added yeast for fermentation. This means they must be relying on wild yeasts if fermentation is to take place. I would not recommend trusting wild yeast to grow faster than bacteria, but that's just my opinion. 3. Most recipes involve your own malting of the 'included grain' So, saving what I think is the best til last, here's what I found: The "malting process" in beer manufacture involves sprouting 'barley' to increase the natural sugar level in the grain, then stopping the process by roasting the grain at the appropriate time (this is what is called "malting"). After roasting, the grain is cracked/ground (depending on the brew) and added to the fermentation vats, along with various and sundry other ingredients including hops and yeast. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ From: Mike Snyder spsbeer@.netins.net I finally got the rice beer recipe. She (my friend's friend) said she's still perfecting it but this one works and it's not the tastiest beer but it's beer. She also said the molasses was mainly for color. 3-21 oz cans/jars of rice syrup (be careful, some contain gluten) 6 cups corn sugar (approx. 2 lbs) 1 pint molasses 2 oz Cascade hops (use whatever kind you like with AA% of 4 - 7) 1 pkg Edme dry ale yeast Bring 1-1/2 gallons of water to a boil. Add all ingredients except 1 oz of hops. Boil for 60 minutes. Add 1/2 oz of hops (for hop flavor) 45 minutes into the boil. Add 1/2 oz of hops (for aroma) during the last 2 minutes of the boil. Cool and add to cold water in primary to make 5 gallons. Pitch yeast when 80 deg F or below. Ferment for 7 - 10 days and bottle using 3/4 cup of priming sugar. Note: She couldn't remember the hop additions so I improvised. If it comes out too sweet add more hops for 60 minutes; too bitter, add less. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ From: Linda Blanchard (paperfan@GENIE.GEIS.COM) Tiswin (Corn Beer) 10 to 12 lbs of dried corn 4 1/2 gal. of pure spring water 5 sticks of canela 8 piloncillo cones 1 orange peel 1 lemon peel Roast corn in a moderately heated oven until the corn is a light brown color. Grind the corn (coarse) and place in a large heavy crock. Add all the water, citrus peel, canela, and piloncillo. Cover and let the mixture ferment. Fermentation will take about 8 to 9 days during cool weather or 4 to 5 days in warm weather. Strain through a cheesecloth, call your closest friends, and drink right away. - note: "The old Apache recipe calls for soaking corn and sprouting it until the seedlings are 1/2 inch long, grinding the sprouts, and boiling them. The resulting mash was then sweetened with mesquite flour or saguaro syrup and allowed to ferment in a brewing jar that was never washed so as to retain the organisms for fermentation. The finished product had to be drunk within a few hours after it was prepared or the alcohol became acetic acid, giving the beverage a sour taste." ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ From: Don Wiss Subject: GINGER BEER 250g grated ginger 4 litres water 1.5 kg sugar 1 tbsp clove/lime juice (helps with the fermentation) NOTE: above was from a recipe book, my parents make their own as the above as a guide and have altered theirs to the following: Also, this is flat and not carbonated 3/4 lb grated ginger 4 litres water 1 lb sugar 1 tbsp rice (uncooked) mix all in a large container and let sit approx. 2 days (placing in the sun helps). Strain. Enjoy!!!! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ From: Katriina Mdkinen (khm@RASHM.SE) Being a keen beer drinker myself I realize that there may be those on this list for whom such delights are impossible and I wondered if there was something that could be done about this sad situation. According the Swedish Celiac Society the following beers are GF (They were tested by the Swedish FDA and *didn't* even contain trace amounts of gluten): Class III San Miguel (Spanish), Kronenbourg (French) Erdinger Weissbier and Welhenstephan Hefe-Weissbier (German) Class II Foster's, Heineken, Budweiser, Urquell and Tuborg GF Whisky: Ballantine, Passport Scoth, Bell's pld Scoth and Four Roses bourbon. GF Vodka: Vodka Wyborowa ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ From: Judy C. Hettena Wright (hettenawright@compuserve.com) Peruvian corn beer-Chica de jora 1 pound dried corn kernels 8 allspice berries 8 quarts cold water 2 cups packed dark brown sugar To make the jora, soak the kernels 2 or 3 days in cold water. Rinse 2 or 3 kitchen towels in cold water and wring them out. Lay the wet towels on a baking tray and spread the drained kernels on top of them. Cover with double layer of dampened cheesecloth (or more towels) and put the tray in a dark place. Spray the cheesecloth with water regularly (keep it damp but not wet) for 8 to 10 days until the kernels sprout. Put the sprouted kernels on a dry try and dry the kernels in a very low oven or over a radiator for a day or two. When they are thoroughly dry, crush them in a food processor or with a rolling pin. In a large stainless steel pot, combine the jora and the allspice, and cover with 8 quarts of cold water. Let them soak for an hour. Bring the pot to the boil over medium heat, lower the heat, and simmer for 4 to 5 hours, stirring occasionally. If you have less then 4 quarts at the end, add enough boiling water to make it up. Let the pot sit for an hour off the heat without stirring. String the corn through a stainless-steel strainer lined with a double layer of cheesecloth into a ceramic (porcelain or glass) container. Twist the cloth to squeeze out all the corn juice. Drop the sugar in. DON'T STIR IT. Cover the container with a dry cloth and place it in a dark, warm and draft-free spot. Let it ferment for about a week, then chill it thoroughly. The longer it sits unchilled, the stronger it gets. It should develop a thick foam on top as it ferments. Note: Dried Jora is usually available through Inca's Foods and avoids having to sprout the kernels oneself: Peruvian Import company, P.O. Box 469, Mahway, NJ 07430 (201) 773-6705. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ From: Carolyn Minor - palocoop@netins.net This is what the author of the recipe said "In my obsessive quest for a good-tasting gluten-free beer this recipe is the best so far. It ends up tasting a little like Coors light, which is at least slightly better than no beer at all. This beer is still in the experimental stages, so feel free to play with the amount of hops, etc or to add another GF ingredients such as molasses or malted millet." Ingredients for 5 gallons: 3 lbs. malted buckwheat (recipe follows) l cup corn sugar l oz. Saaz hops 2 oz. Hallertauer Hersbrucker hops 6 lbs. rice syrup l pkg. ale yeast (EDME) Put crushed malted buckwheat into strainer bag, add 1 1/2 gallons of water in brewpot. Keep buckwheat in brewpot stirring, until water starts boiling. Remove buckwheat and add rice syrup, corn sugar, and 1/2 oz. each of the Saaz and Hallertauer hops. Boil for 30 minutes and add 1/4 oz. each of the Saaz and Hallertauer hops. Boil for l5 minutes and add another =BC oz. of each type of hops. Boil for another 15 min. to make a total boiling time of 1 hour, then let the remaining 1 oz. Hallertauer hops steep in the wort for two (2) minutes. Strain into your fermenter and pitch yeast when cooled. This "beer" will ferment for longer than most ales, for about l0 days. Add 3/4 cup corn sugar for bottling, and let the beer age for at least 1 week before drinking. Instructions for Malted Buckwheat: Since as gluten-free homebrewers we can't just go to our homebrew supply store and buy malted buckwheat or millet, we must malt it ourselves in order to brew with it. Luckily, this is a pretty simple process. First, obtain raw (that is, uncooked and untoasted) buckwheat from a health food store or coop. Rinse about l lb. and let is sit for 30-48 hours completely submerged in water, rinsing it off every 8 hours or so. The buckwheat will expand as it soaks up some of the water and also produce a sticky oily substance which should be rinsed off. Now put the buckwheat into a strainer or find-mesh colander and let it sit in the open air in a cool, dark place, rinsing off every 8 hours to prevent mold. After 1 day you will see rootlets forming. Let the buckwheat sit in the open air for about 2 days, or until some of the rootlets are about twice as long as the grain bodies. Spread the buckwheat out in a thin layer on several cookie sheets and bake in a 200-250 deg. oven until the buckwheat becomes hard and crunchy (tastes remarkably like Grape-Nuts) At this point you may increase the temperature and make dark-roasted buckwheat, for darker-colored beers. Use a rolling pin or a glass jar to crush the buckwheat. All the above was copied as this guys recipe was posted. I had a hard time crushing the buckwheat with a rolling pin etc. - I put a little at a time in my food blender - on crush(I think) and "ground" it up that way. As I said I had never brewed before this - if you are experienced you may see some things to do differently right away, or after one batch you may want to change it in some way. If I can be of any help OR IF you find some improvements to this recipe please let me know. Good Luck! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lynn Samuel (samueJ@AOL.COM) Subject: Hot Spiced Wine (German Gluhwein) 4 C (1 liter) water 3 cinnamon sticks 1/2 C sugar 1 lemon peel (not the lemon) 12 whole cloves 2 liter bottles red wine Combine all EXCEPT THE WINE. Boil 15 minutes. Strain. Add wine and simmer. Do not boil. Serves 10-12. NOTE: I leave cloves and cinnamon in when reheating and storing, but be sure to remove lemon peel! -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Miscelleanous~Miscelleanous~Miscelleanous~Miscelleanous~Miscelleanous~

From: Anne Rickaby (Anne_Rickaby/CAM/Lotus@LOTUS.COM) Subject: Summary: cooking w/coconut milk I got a number of responses (and a recipe - below) Many people warned about the high fat content. (But I'd only use it for an occasional special treat, so I'm not too worried about that.) Some folks suggested diluting 1:1 with water. One person commented that "Coconut milk is sweeter than cows milk so you have to compensate by reducing the amount of sugar in your recipe." One person warned that I "be sure to determine how the coconut milk is made (that is, has ordinary milk been mixed with the coconut to make it richer)." Good reminder. I have Thai Kitchen pure coconut milk, which has nothing added. A couple of people have used it successfully as a substitute for cow's milk in pumpkin pie (which is exactly what I want to do!!!) Several people have used it in Asian dishes successfully, but not in western baking. One warning for anyone who wants to use it to make an ice cream substitute - "Coconut milk doesn't freeze like ordinary milk so it doesn't work well for making icecream. The result is waxy and unpleasant after it freezes solid." (I'm so glad I don't really like ice cream...) There's a Web page at http://www.panix.com/~nomilk/coconut.txt dedicated to using coconut milk (thanks to Don !) One person recommended a product called Darifree, which is a potato-based dairy substitute. (Although, at this point, after having such a bad experience with Rice Dream, I'm wary of anything that's not "pure.") If I get any new information, I'll let you know. I'll also pass along anything I discover in my cooking "experiments." ASIAN TAPIOCA PUDDING 3 1/2 C unsweetened coconut milk 2/3 C small pearl tapioca or quick cooking tapioca (I use Minute Tapioca) 2/3 C sugar (or less, I have also used brown sugar and Suanat with fine results) I vanilla bean split lengthwise (or I t vanilla extract) pince salt I large egg, separated In a heavy nonreactive saucepan, combine coconut milk, tapioca, sugar vanilla bean and salt (but not vanilla extract, if you are using that) over low heat. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until tapioca pearls are translucent - about 10 minutes. Be careful not to let it scorch. If it seems lumpy, use a whisk on it. Vigorously stir in egg yolk (and vanilla extract, if using that), remove from heat. Cover and let stand til lukewarm - 30-60 min. Remove the vanilla bean and scrape seeds into the pudding, stir. In a small bowl, beat the egg white until it forms stiff peaks. Fold it into the lukewarm pudding. Chill or serve warm. It is good served with thinly sliced orange rounds on top. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Jennifer Lasher (wavride2@ix.netcom.com) Subject: "Special K" Bars 1c. sugar 1c. karo syrup Combine these two in a pan and stir until sugar is completely dissolved. Don't bring to a boil or bars won't be chewy. Add: 1c. peanut butter When blended take off heat immediately. Add 6 cups (used to be Special K, but anything GF that is similar, crispy rice cereals might be good) and press into a greased cake pan. Top with a semi-sweet/butterscotch combination, pre-melted and blended. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "Susan K. DeVries" (devriess@RIVER.IT.GVSU.EDU) Subject: garbonzo bean summary I received several suggestions including: * Cookbooks - Bette Hagman's 3rd book "GF Gorment cooks fast & healthy" (Bette's Book was suggested by several people who use garbonzo flour in place of the bean flours she suggests) -"Full of Beans" (I don't know who wrote it) -Kay Spicer's "Best of Beans" -Carol Fenster's Book (I don't know what it is called) * Try making B. Hagman's cinnamon nut bread on bread machine's fast rise setting * Recipes on Authentic Food's web site * Works well in chocolate chip cookies * Some suggest replacing 1 for 1 with white or brown rice, but most people suggested some experimenting with smaller amounts at first and then adding more next time if you like. Beans can give you gas. :) * texture is good, more like flours with gluten. Will rise more than rice flour mixes Some suggested mixtures: 1 C garbonzo flour 1 1/2 C rice flour 1/2 c potato starch (might want to add 1 tsp xanthan gum for every 3-4 cups of flour mix) Another mix: 4 parts either soy or garbonzo flour 3 parts potato starch 2 parts white rice 1 part corn (flour or starch) --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Michele Baillies (michele@PALACENET.NET) Subject: Cocktail Sauce Summary I received many responses to my request. Most people make their own. Below are the responses I received: 1. Heinz catsup, Andrews Horseradish (made with water not vinegar) and lemon juice. Proportions to your taste. 2. Delmonte Seafood Cocktail Sauce is GF. 3. Fresh horseradish root (peeled, cut into chunks and put in blender), mix with Heinz ketchup. May add cider vinegar if you wish. 4. Catsup, horseradish, lemon juice. 5. 1/3 cup ketchup and 1/4 tsp horseradish sauce. 6. Heinz ketchup with prepared horseradish (Boar's Head). Add Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauce and some San-J organic wheat free tamari soy sauce. Start with ketchup and just add ingredients. 7. Ketchup with added lemon juice and horseradish to taste. Probably halp a cup to one cup ketchup plus juice of one lemon. Then keep adding horseradish by teaspoon until spicy enough. 8. Heinz Chili Sauce and add pure horseradish, a dash of Worcestershire, onion powder, fresh ground pepper -- we love it. You can make it as hot as you like w/horseradish, the plain , ground kind, not the creamy type. Let sit to release flavors. 9. Buy kosher horseradish, mix with GF hot sauce, Heinz ketchup and a little lemon juice. 10. Mix some ketchup with fresh grated horseradish, squeeze lemon, tabasco & worcestershire if you like. I sometimes only use the first three and let set for an hour for flavors to blend. The closer to room temp., the hotter the horseradish gets. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Lisa McKinney (lisabeth@IX.NETCOM.COM) Subject: Teriyaki Summary (& Chinese) Suggestion No. 1: 5 oz. San-J Wheat Free "Reduced Sodium" Tamari Soy Sauce 6 oz. unsweetened pineapple juice 1/4 cup brown sugar 1 clove fresh garlic, minced (optional) 1 TBSP grated fresh ginger (or 1tsp. ground dried ginger) Heat liquid ingredients, add brown sugar, mix till dissolved. Add garlic and ginger, then cool. Wonderful, flavorful, not salty, and easy to make! Takes less than five minutes to make. Recommended marinating time: 4-18 hours. Enjoy!! (San-J, Virginia offices: 800-446-5500) One poster also thought San-J Teriyaki Sauce was GF but hadn't used it in awhile and suggested confirming this. --------------------------- Suggestion No. 2: 1 Cup San-J wheat free soy sauce 2-3 cloves of garlic (minced) 2 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger 1/2 cup red wine 1/2 cup water 1/3 cup honey The above amounts are estimates. I just throw it all together. Hope it turns out okay. --------------------------- Suggestion No. 3: 1/2 Cup GF soy sauce 1/4 cup dry sherry or sake (rice wine) 1 Tbsp. sugar (I add a bit more, depends how sweet you like it) Mix all ingredients till sugar dissolves. You can heat on stove to dissolve sugar as well, but cool it down before marinating. I marinate fish for a couple of hours in the fridge and then broil fish. While broiling keep brushing with marinade every few minutes. ---------------------------- Suggestion No. 4: GF soy sauce, brown sugar. Also you could use some honey. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: David J Walland (David.Walland@bristol.ac.uk) Subject: Pumpkin recipes Because it is so imprecise, I now ignore all recipes with dry materials measured in cups. Those that were sent to me in this measure form are not on this compilation. For our continental friends 1 oz is about 25 g 1 lb is about 450 g the calculation of farenheit to centigrade is subtract 32, divide by 9 and multiply by 5 (400 F is about 200 C) Here's the Curried Pumpkin Soup recipe adapted from ~Food&Wine_ magazine, November 1997. Good luck. 9 lbs. sugar pumpkins, halved lengthwise, or cut into large pieces 2 TB acceptable vegetable oil (1 like toasted sesame) 5 pears -- peeled, cored, and cut into 2-inch chunks 3 large Spanish onions, sliced 15 garlic cloves, chopped 4 TB hot homemade curry powder 2 minced fresh chillies salt and freshly ground pepper 4 qts. homemade chicken or vegetable broth l+112 cups dry white wine 1 cup heavy cream Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Place the halved or large pumpkin pieces on 2 rimmed baking sheets and add 112 cup water on each sheet. The pumpkin should be skin side up. Bake for about l+112 hours, or until tender. When cool enough to handle, discard the seeds and peel the pumpkin. Heat the oil in a large heavy stock pot. Add the pears, onions, garlic, curry powder, chillies, and a large pinch each of salt and pepper. Cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the onions are tender. Add the cooked pumpkins, stock, and wine and bring to a boil over high heat. Stir well, reduce the heat to moderate and simmer for 45 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool for 5 minutes. Working in batches, puree the soup in a blender or food processor until smooth; transfer to a clean saucepan and season with salt and pepper. (if you aren't feeding 12 people, at this point, portion out the soup and freeze or can it.) To serve, reheat the soup, ladle into shallow bowls and swirl in the heavy cream as a garnish. Chopped fresh coriander/cilantro is also nice on top. The original recipe, from Hammersley's Bistro in Boston, MA garnishes the soup with a homemade pappadum wafer, but that recipe contained gluten. The soup is good on its own; if you have a pappadum recipe or gf pappadum available, cut the pappadum into wedgesand fry them as a nice crisp accompaniment. I hope you enjoy this recipe. I do love pumpkins and winter squashes of all kinds, so I'm pretty picky about the type. I have also used red kuri squash, butternut, acorn, and, even, Hubbard successfully in pumpkin soup recipes. I know this may not be exactly what you are looking for but, we too had an abundance of pumpkin this past fall. Also any recipe you have for Quick Breads calling for apples, zuchccini, even bananas you can substitute either diced pumpkin or pureed pumpkin, toss in the nuts or whatever else your recipe calls for. Hi David, here's a flavorful pumpkin soup recipe. As you'll see, the measures are mostly in pieces... i don't remember them exactly myself. Pumpkin soup 4 lbs pumpkin 3 large carrots 3-4 medium sized tomatoes 1 large or two medium onions 50 g butter 3 tablespoons fresh dill finely chopped sour cream salt, pepper Cut (edible part of) pumpkin in 1" cubes, carrots into 112" slices. Put both in a large pot and cover with water. The original recipe called for the water to be 2 cm deep above the pumpkin, but the pumpkin will float, so do what you can. Bring to a boil and simmer for -40 minutes, or until the pumpkin is soft. In the meantime, chop the onions, peel and chop the tomatoes. Melt the butter in a deep pan and sautee the onions until they turn translucent. Add the tomatoes and sautee briefly. When the pumpkin is soft, add the onion-tomato mix, transfer to a blender and puree. Pour back into pot, reheat gently, add the dill and salt and pepper to taste. Serve with a dollop of sour cream (or Creme Fraiche, if you can get that) in each bowl. Enjoy! Part of the issue to consider with flavor is what kind of pumpkin did you grow? Is it a sugar or pie pumpkin, which produces denser, sweeter "meat"? Standard Jack O'Lantern pumpkins are largely inedible because they are so fibrous and watery. Then there is the pumpkin that runs in between and is best treated as a winter squash. Thus, if the pumpkin is not sugar/pie pumpkin, no matter how tasty the recipe, if it is watered down pumpkin flavor, there will be less flavor. I sent out a pumpkin bread recipe that uses 14 ounces of pie pumpkin, cooked, earlier this week. Pie pumpkins may also be cooked down into a "pumpkin butter" like applesauce, with lots of grated ginger, cinnamon, and allspice cooked in with the pumpkin. Pie pumpkins may also be cooked into pumpkin chutney, where the spices are hotter or more complex, depending on your preference. I don't have a recipe for pumpkin but... To flavor pumpkin, use the following spices: mace, nutmeg, cloves, ginger, and/or cinnamon. The first four are especially delicious mixed into your cooked pumpkin. Those are the favorite spices for pumpkin pie. You can use pumpkin for pudding as well. Same spices. You can boil your pumpkin until tender (or cook cut pieces in the microwave until soft), scoop out the meat (that's the pumpkin between the shell outside and the seeds inside), mash it up, spice it up with the above spices to taste - salt too - and serve as a vegetable. Some people add butter as well. You can make pudding with pumpkin. Use a GF pudding recipe and dump in a cup or so of cooked pumpkin AND some or all of the above spices for flavoring. You can use pumpkin to make GF pumpkin bread or pumpkin muffins. See your favorite GF baking book for appropriate recipes. Have fun. Pumpkin is very good for you nutrionally. Baked or boiled or microwaved and seasoned and served as a side dish, it is absolutely wonderful as well as healthy and colorful. Pumpkin is a squash. We generally put nutmeg and butter and salt on it when serving it as a side dish, but that's because I'm too lazy to get out the mace and ginger as well. Those three are my favorites for flavoring pumpkin. David, try making pumpkin pie with out crust but put it in custard cups or pie dishes. We found on fresh, if you cut it in half or quarters clean it out turn it upside down on a cookie sheet and bake it till it just collapses and spoon out, add you pie ingredients then mix, and then blend it with a blender till very smooth it will be lite as air and very tasty. Have fun. I've never had much luck with pumpkin either, except for the obvious--the seeds. Toasting them in the oven and salting them lightly makes a delicious snack. I also sometimes use chunks of fresh pumpkin in stews, though I don't have a recipe for this. The best recipe I know is pumpkin risotto; cook some chunks in the oven with some soy sauce (or water), in pan covered with aluminum foil; mash and add finely chopped nuts+thyme, in pan with oil to reheat, add to rice (cooked with some onion/leeks) adapted from the weekend FT Pumpkin & other squashes figure prominently in native American cooking. I am not sure of the availability of these ingredients in the UK, but otherwise here's an easy recipe.... Pumpkin Stew Cut up some of the pumpkin in cubes. Add approximately equal portions (or adjust to your tastes or availability) posole (also called hominy: could substitute corn kernals) and cooked beans (pintos, red beans, etc). Add water to cook pumpkin, etc. Season with chili powder, onion. You can also add canned tomatoes, garlic, meat, etc. It's sort of like chili. Well I have also ended up with a huge pumpkin. I used up the small ones and have left this one for last! Here are some of the things I do with fresh pumpkin. First of all I take out the seeds, (no need to wash them) add a little oil and sprinkle with salt and bake on a cookie sheet 350 degree oven for 15-20 minutes, until light brown. Makes a great snack. Next I cut up the pumpkin peal and cut into cubes, place in 1 gal. zip lock bags and freeze for future use. Pumpkin Soup In a large pot, Saute 1 chopped onion and 2 cloves garlic in 1 tablespoon oil. Add 1 teaspoon curry powder, 1 tsp ground mace, 1 tsp cinnamon. Fill pot with pumpkin squares (or as much as you want to make) fill with chicken broth or water to barely cover pumpkin. Cook 20-30 min. or until pumpkin is tender. Blend with hand blender in pot, or use a potato masher. Add 1 small can eveporated milk.( or soy or other milk) and salt and pepper to taste and serve. Pumpkin lentil Soup Same as above only add 1/2 cup lentils and 1-2 pealed and chopped potatoes. For variety may also add 1 large can chopped tomatoes, and use basil instead of curry, mace and cinnamon. I also add the pumpkin squares to soups and stews You can also make pumpkin butter (like apple butter) in jars and give to friends as gifts. I also steam the pumpkin and serve with butter and salt and pepper as a vegetable (can be done in the microwave with just a little water). Hope you have fun with the above. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Art Raiche (Art.Raiche@mq.edu.au) Subject: Rice Flour Summary In choosing flour combinations, you might care to look at the relative nutrients. Tapioca flour is less than terrific in this regard. We tend to use equal parts of brown rice flour and buckwheat (Buckwheat isn't a grain, it is related to rhubarb). These produce a delicious product which is also a nutritional dynamo. For example, we make a bread out of these two flours plus milk, eggs, molasses, chopped dates, poppy seeds plus purees of banana and apple. The raising agents are bicarbonate of soda and tartaric acid. The whole thing takes less than 10 minutes to prepare (no kneading necessary since there is no gluten) plus 45 minutes baking. The result is something which tastes like sticky date poudding but is far more nutritious than any commercial wholemeal bread, Orgran make a pasta out of brown rice flour which is more delicate than the finest wheat pasta plus having a lovely taste. Why not take advantage of the rethink necessary when you learn you have to go GF and investigate the use of brown rice, buckwheat, millet plus the flours which come from these. Leave the bland fillers behind. Your health will improve and the flavours are lovely. Some of you are convinced that you don't have time to cook. Cooking can be a life enhancing activity. The aesthetics of preparing and eating your own food are a form of meditation, maybe more important one than some of the other things which keep you so busy. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Paul Kagan (Paul.A.Kagan@NOAA.GOV) Subject: Matzoh - store bought / home made These Pesach recipes come by way of Beth Hillson at the GF panty (Not affiliated, no financial interest etc.) and appear in their newsletter THE GUT REACTION. I havent tried them yet but Beth assures me that though they sound weird they're great. Connie's Un-Matzoh Balls (she credits one Connie Margolin who came up with the formula inspired by a recipe in Joan Nathan's Jewish Holiday Kitchen 4 eggs 3 Tbs rendered chicken fat, softened 1 tsp salt 1/4 tsp Xanthan gum 1 cup Idaho spuds (Instant potatoes) 4 TBs chicken stock Beat eggs with chicken fat Add salt and xanthan gum to Instant potatoes. Add stock. Chill 20-30 minutes. Wet hands. Use teaspoon to help form rounded balls and plop on a plate. Steam on a steaming ring in wok or make a quick steamer using a large skillet fitted with a cover.: Fill skillet with about 3 inches of water. Bring to a boil. Set a ring in the middle of the pan. Set plate on ring and cover skillet. Let steam, covered, about 20 minutes. Or drop un-matzoh balls into simmering chicken soup and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Both methods were successful. Best results came from steaming, then reheating in soup before serving. There's a recipe for matzo that uses the GF Pantry French Bread/Pizza mix which I'll include because I think many folks may have it. ------------------- Matzo 2 cups GF Pantry french bread/pizza Mix 1/3 Tbs sugar 1 tsp. baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 4 Tbs cold butter cut into small pieces 4-5 Tbs cold water Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine French Bread/Pizza Mix, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add butter and rub into flour mixture until texture is crumbly. Add water a teaspoon at a time until dough forms a firm ball. Spray a flat surface with vegetable spray. Roll out dough to 1/8 inch thick. Trim into rectangles. Place on parchment lined cookie sheet and prick all over with a fork. Bake 15-20 minutes or until light brown. Happy Pesach to all! judy in gloriously sunny nyc ------------------- 1c. GF flour mix (without leavening added) [Leavening is baking powder, baking soda, yeast, etc.] 3 tsp. water 1 egg pinch salt. Mix ingredients well to get uniform "dough". Add water if necessary. GF flour your work surface and roll out the dough into a thinnish leaf. Cut it into squares, peirce with a fork, etc. to make it look like the matzot we knew and loved and put it straight on the rack of your oven (I use a toaster oven). Bake on high heat (around 440 deg) until it just starts to turn brown. The idea behind any matza is that it be baked within 18 minutes of adding liquid to the flour, and quickly at high heat. ------------------- From: Nehemiah Trustees Covenant Fund (ntcf@NETVISION.NET.IL) Connie in NYC has given me permission to post her recipe for matza to the list. By now it may be too late to try this for this Passover but then there's always next year. This is best when baked and eaten the same day. 1 cup potato starch 1 egg yolk 6 T apple cider Whiz it in the processor until a ball forms. Cut into 6 sections, roll each into a little ball. Flatten on parchment, cover with more parchment and roll out thin. Prick with a fork. Bake at 425 until solid and brown at edges. (3 per cookie sheet) Peel from parchment and bake some more on the rack itself until browned nicely. ------------------- From Diane Smith I preface this post with the caveat, that not all those celebrating Passover may agree. However, Sephardic and many Reform Jews will eat rice during Passover. I realize that other Jews may not be comfortable with this. If you are comfortable eating rice, Hol-grain rice crackers make a very good substitute for matzoh. They also make delicious matzoh balls. Just grind them up until they are the same texture as matzoh meal. Follow the directions on the Manishevitz Matzoh ball mix box, just substitute the Hol-grain ground crackers for the matzoh meal. For those of you who don't feel comfortable trying this on Passover, but miss matzoh balls, I suggest you try this for another holiday. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Sally Lopez (slopez@erols.com) Subject: Gravy - Summary Thanks so much for all the gravy suggestions (which follow). I can't wait to bake a chicken or turkey again! Sally, Virginia Buy some chicken necks and backs and put them in the pressure cooker for 1/2 an hour with water and onion, celery, carrots and garlic. Thicken with some cornstarch and water. His (a group member's)grandmother gravey started w/ pan dripping w/ added flour which was browned--basically a roux. It didn't work will rice flour. Experimentation produced an acceptable g.f. alternative. Heat a rounded tablespoonful of sweet rice flour over medium heat in a DRY fry pan. Stir often & cook until it turns a light golden brown color. Add pan drippings, stir to mix. Add milk, water, broth or boullion to thin to the desired consistency (about a cup). Mix w/ a whisk to remove lumps if necessary & continue cooking for a while longer to finish cooking the rice flour--it will not break down like cornstarch. The browned sweet rice flour gives it a rich nutty taste unlike anything your normal get when using rice flour. If you can find a Watkins rep. in your area (it is a company that sells home products) They have soup bases chicken and beef that are gluten free and can be used to make gravy also. We make gravy with potato starch using the same recipe as with Wondra except that you use about half as much potato starch. I use Swan brand Potato Starch Flour (found at Safeway stores). Use it as you do flour with the meat drippings. Don't use too much though, it thickens very quickly. I find this makes the best white sauce I've ever made (recipe on box). In the Kosher section find the little broth cubes, chicken, beef, onion, mushroom, be sure they are stamped "kosher for Passover" - they are wonderful! GF gravy isn't difficult. Herb Ox bouillon is GF. Just mix some granulated bouillon (chicken or beef-flavored) with the pan juices (or with water) and stir in a little cornstarch for thickening. If you want it a little more flavorful, saute some mushrooms over high heat in a little butter (this will glaze both the bottom of the pan and the mushrooms), then stir in the dissolved bouillon and pan juices, scraping up the glaze from the bottom of the pan. Add a little pepper. I always just add potatoe flakes to my liquid. Like Chicken stock and it turns out GREAT. and GF never any lumps! What I generally do is use any of the meat drippings from cooking and add a small packedt of Herb-Ox boullion (for either beef or chicken) and continue stirring while adding a small mixture (1-2 tablespoons cornstarch to 1 cup water) bubbling and stirring this mixture til it reaches desired thickness. I know that the regular Herb-Ox packets are GF but they do have a low salt version that I personally have never checked on gluten status. I just use the juice from whatever meat I am cooking, heat it up in a pot on the stove, add water and cornstarch(not too much of each-experiement a little), and stir while heating until you get the desired consistancy. If it's too runny, add a little more cornstarch and continue heating and stirring. Try Watkins beef or chicken soup and gravy mix. Both are GF as is their white sauce. We love it. I use about 2 Tablespoons of drippings off the meat. In a separate bowl mix about a tablespoon of potato starch with a half cup water. Stir this into the drippings and then add about a cup more water. Over medium heat, STIR! until the mixture thickens to the desired consistancy. You can add little bits of onion or mushrooms if desired, and salt and pepper to taste. If you use the juice off canned mushrooms instead of water you get a little more flavor. Potato starch works better than tapioca starch. Arrowroot can also be Look in your bouillon section of your grocery. I have found something called "Better Than Bouillon". It comes in a jar in many different flavored bases and the company says they are all GF. I just use GF beef or chicken broth & cornstach/water mixture. If I bake a chicken or bake beef, I drain the juices and then heat up and mix a little cornstarch or rice flour in at a time. This is quite simple if you can do it fast and not get any lumps. I can't give you exact proportions, but I use stock (vegetable, chicken or beef - GF, of course) as the base for gravy, whisk in a mixture of flour (or cornstarch) and cold water stirred together (how much of each depends on how much gravy you're making and how thick you want it). The whisking helps prevent lumps. Try a litle Lea & Perrins worcestershire sauce (original and white wine versions are both GF) for a bit more "beefy" taste. My wife uses corn starch and broth... plus seasonings. I don't know if you're looking for a recipe for "gravy not from meat". I don't know how to do that. I never liked "gravy" from a box anyway. I use the drippings from frying or baking the meat, add some water and either cream or a little bit of corn starch to thicken. Then adjust the flavor with some salt + pepper (in addition to what you put on the meat). AS long as you can have corn starch, this recipe that my mom has used for years works great. I have never had a bad batch of gravy. First, make sure you measure all of the liquid. Just drain off the juice from a roast or chicken, or you can use beef stock, too. Then add enough water so that you will have enough gravy for the number of folks you are feeding. Then, in a small bowl or something (I just use the one cup liquid measure.) spoon heaping tablespoons of cornstarch into a cup of water. You need a tablespoon of cornstarch for every cup of liquid. So, if you had a half-cup of meat juice and added two and a half cups of water, you need about four heaping tablespoons of cornstarch. (Remember, you have a cup of liquid you are mixing with.) Mix the cornstarch so it is all dissolved in the bowl, and then pour the mixture into the meat juice and water. Bring this whole thing to a boil, making sure you stir it constantly, because the cornstarch will settle out if you don't stir it. Once the gravy boils, you are ready to serve! I find I now prefer to add a little chicken broth to the chicken pan and thicken it with some sweet rice flour and water than the old way. Cream gravy, I make a roux with Asian sweet rice flour and add milk as I whisk til it thickens. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: "John C. Paulsen" (jony@GOODNET.COM) Subject: LECITHIN summary A while back I posted an inquiry as to the use of LECITHIN as an additive when making GF bread, specifically the following questions--- (How much is used in a batch?, 2) Which is the better to use, the liquid (lecithin or the granular lecithin?, and 3)Is it added to the wet or the dry (ingredients? I received five responses which are summarized as follows: 1) Added 1 tbs of the granules to the dry ingredients 2) Added 1 tbs of the liquid to the wet ingredients. Liquid lecithin is very sticky and utensils are hard to clean up. 3) Added 1/4 tsp of the liquid to make a one lb loaf in a Welbilt machine. Information was in the Welbilt manual which has GF bread recipes. 4) Added abt 1-2 tsp of liquid lecithin to the wet ingredients. Liquid is hard to measure due to stickiness. 5) Provided the following additive guidelines obtained from a conference: 1 tsp of ascorbic acid (vitamin C)---more rise 1 tsp-1 tbs fruit pectin---high rise 1 tsp rice or cider vinegar---preservative 1 tbs Clear-Gel---high rise 1 tsp lecithin granules---preservative. I tried adding abt 1/2 tbs of the granules to a 1 1/2 loaf batch by TRYING!! to dissolve them in the wet ingredients only to have the granules bond to the oil and become a sticky glob. Must have eventually dissolved though because I could find no residue in the finished loaf. Also could not see a noticeable difference in the finished product. Will try adding the dry to the dry ingredients directly. Thanks again to the responders. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Debora Moes (moemac@EXECULINK.COM) Subject: Substitution of flour in recipes...summary I recieved 36 replies and was astounded at the response to help me in my quest to bake! Everybody said yes you can substitute GF Flour. Of course it was suggested to use a mixture of gf flours. Bette Hagmans mixture was the most popular. The recipe is as follows: 2 cups of rice flour 2/3 cup of potato starch 1/3 cup of tapioca flour It was suggested over and over again to get her books. She has taken a lot of the guess work out of GF baking. Liquid adjustments may be needed if mixture is too dry. Everybody suggested to add more baking soda/baking powder..a rule of thumb is 21/2 tsp of baking powder to 1 cup of GF Flour To add moisture to recipes add extra eggs,or replace some of the GF Flour with soy flour it holds moisture better. Adding applesauce is another way to get more moisture. Someone read that 7/8 cups of rice flour equals 1 cup of wheat flour. In the book "The Joy of Cooking" they have a section on stubstituting flours and it is a good source for information. One person had good luck with using Welplan or EnerG baking mix. They didn't need to add anything and the recipes turned out just fine. More suggestions such as sifting your substitue flours before adding to the mixute is a good idea, when possible use buttermilk instead of regular milk to dessert recipes this will give a lighter finished product. Always put finished prodducts into the freezer for long term edibility. Baking time will vary generally desserts take less time to bake...but not always. Equal substitutions for bread recipes was not recommended..there are may bread recipes in the archives. These recipes have been previously made and usually work. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Nathan (nathan@VALINET.COM) Subject: Measuring Gluten Free Flour: There have often been discussions on this list that Gluten Free baked goods are much more "calorie dense" than equivalent ones made with wheat flour. I've done a fair bit of research and work in baking for Celiacs as my wife is a celiac who also has severe food sensitivities of other types. I believe that gluten free baked _can_ be more calorie dense but don't have to be. Here are my suggestions: If you are allergic to eggs or wish to cut down on the saturated fats, substitute 2 ounces of milk (1/4 US cup) and the equivalent _VOLUME_ (4 US tablespoons - 60 cc's, 60 ml) of non fat dry powdered milk. According to my calcuations, this yields the equivalent protein of an egg white - so it gives some "sticky" as egg whites do without the egg. Cook by _weight_. Four ounces of wheat flour by weight is approximately one US cup - the familiar cup measures for baking. If you use the Bette Hagman flour mixture, but go by _weight_ rather than volume you will find that your baked goods have the same number of carbohydrate grams in them as the equivalent gluten-filled baked goods - 1 gram of carbohydrate has 4 calories, no matter what. I find that when I learned to bake, I learned using a UK cookbook (Delia Smith's Illustrated Cookery Course, for the UK members of the list) so I bought a scale, and seldom now go back to cooking with cup measures. Weight is, simply, easier. Use skimmed milk instead of whole. As an aside, I find that Ms. Hagman's recipes are very good but that she uses much more Xanthan gum than needed. I find that I use no more than 1/4 US teaspoon of Xanthan gum per four ounces (by weight) of her flour. --------------------------------------------------------------------- From: Pixilated@WORLDNET.ATT.NET Subject: Muffin top bake pans/Summary 4 people felt that the muffin top pans were too thin, and felt that english muffin rings or tuna fish cans worked better. One suggested cutting the tuna can in half. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Others suggested these methods: I have never used a muffin top pan, but I have seen a suggestion to bake in Texas size muffin pans using them about 1/2 full for hamburger buns. **************** ...what I do is use aluminum foil...fold it a few times and then form into a circle...viola..a hamburger mold...it works fine too ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ One is still experiementing with different recipes and solutions... I hope she posts her successful ones! :) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ And several people liked them for these reasons: I have the muffin to pans w/ non stick coating & really like them. I use mine mostly for quickbreads--they are slightly larger than cupcakes tins & are also easier to pack in lunches & don't break as easily. Celiac friends also have them & use them for rolls. You have to be carefully that you don't fill them too full, because you will have too much bread in your rolls. I had seen some at an upscale department store which were about $12 / pan, but I got a different brand at K-Mart for less & they cost less & work well. ***************** I use the muffin topper pans for hamburger buns using Bette Hagmans Rapid Rise French Bread recipe from her second book. I had tried using the muffin rings I bought in a specialty shops and found these very hard to use. ***************** I have them and I love them. I use them (surprise) for muffins--they wind up with a wonderful crust. Julia Child used another method (depending on your batter). I don't know which recipe you're using, but if it is a fairly stiff batter, you can use English Muffin rings. You cut the top and bottoms off either tuna fish cans or cat food cats, wash well, and grease well. If the batter is "loose", and it must be contained, then the muffin top pans will work well. You can make muffins and use them for "sandwiches". ***************** I got one of the muffin pans and they work like a charm. I kept waiting for them to go on sale but finally splurged and am quite satisfied. ***************** they work great for all gf baking. i bought mine at a tjmaxx store at a discounted price and it was worth the price. muffins and all bread recipes turn out great in a perfect size for all purposes. Best of all they get done on the inside. ***************** I have been using these pans for hamburger buns for over a year and find that they work very well. One recipe of bread dough (either Our Favorite or Farmhouse Buttermilk from the Red Star yeast gluten free recipes for bread machines) makes 11 buns of a reasonable thickness. After they rise to about double I bake them about 25 minutes at 375 degrees. To bake both pans at the same time, I put one pan on the middle rack and one on the next rack level down, bake 15 minutes, and then reverse the pans for the last 10 minutes. Sure hope this helps. And I do agree about the price being excessive. **************** we use a muffin top baking pan to make hamburger buns. We just use our favorite bread recipe and keep an eye on them in the oven. It works great. **************** We used the muffin-top pans to bake sandwich buns, and we call them hockey puck bread. WE used a tapioca, white rice flour bread recipe to make the sandwich/hamburger buns. They taste really good. The texture is quite different from that of regular bread, but I would have to say that the taste of the hockey puck bread is better than that of regular bread. they keep well in the freezer also. ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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